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Physics - Innovation - 21.11.2022
New quantum tool developed in groundbreaking experimental achievement
Scientists recreate properties of light in neutral fundamental particles called neutrons For the first time in experimental history, researchers at the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) have created a device that generates twisted neutrons with well-defined orbital angular momentum. Previously considered an impossibility, this groundbreaking scientific accomplishment provides a brand new avenue for researchers to study the development of next-generation quantum materials with applications ranging from quantum computing to identifying and solving new problems in fundamental physics.

Health - Social Sciences - 17.11.2022
Greenspaces should support mental health among young adults
Greenspaces should support mental health among young adults
Even though many global cities incorporate greenspaces such as pocket parks and community gardens into their urban planning efforts, new UBC research shows those plans often fail to include the needs of youth and young adults between the ages of 15 and 24. As a result, this age demographic can miss out on the known social, physical and mental health benefits of these nature-based solutions.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 17.11.2022
Millions at risk as drylands degrade, finds study
Millions at risk as drylands degrade, finds study
Drylands are experiencing increasingly levels of degradation and desertification, changes that could put already vulnerable populations at greater risk. A research team, including Natasha MacBean , conducted an examination of dryland productivity and its important role in global carbon and water cycling, to understand the impact of climate change and human activity on future dryland ecosystem functioning.

Health - 17.11.2022
Study suggests honey reduces cardiometabolic risks
Researchers at the University of Toronto have found that honey improves key measures of cardiometabolic health, including blood sugar and cholesterol levels - especially if the honey is raw and from a single floral source. The researchers conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials on honey and found that it lowered fasting blood glucose, total and LDL, or "bad," cholesterol, triglycerides and a marker of fatty liver disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.11.2022
Tick-borne pathogens increasingly widespread in Central Canada
Tick-borne pathogens increasingly widespread in Central Canada
Tick-borne pathogens, known for causing illnesses such as Lyme disease, are on the rise in Central Canada - presenting new risks in areas where they were never previously detected. The findings from researchers at McGill University and the University of Ottawa demonstrate the need for more comprehensive testing and tracking to detect the spread and potential risk of tick-borne pathogens to human and wildlife populations throughout Canada.

Event - 16.11.2022
Alumni Know: Why does giving feel good?
Social psychologist Sara Konrath (BA '02) shares the science behind giving and some unexpected benefits of generosity By Megan Vander Woude Office of Advancement Every November and December, we hear a lot about giving. No matter what you're celebrating this holiday season, you're sure to be inundated with messages of spending time with loved ones, giving thoughtful gifts and giving back to others.

Earth Sciences - Astronomy / Space - 16.11.2022
New observation method helps unlock secrets of U.K. meteorite
New observation method helps unlock secrets of U.K. meteorite
The Winchcombe meteorite, a rare carbonaceous meteorite which crashed onto a driveway in Gloucestershire in 2021, has been found to contain extra-terrestrial water and organic compounds that reveal insights into the origin of Earth's oceans. A new study, published today by Science Advances , led by experts from the Natural History Museum and the University of Glasgow reports the orbital history and first laboratory analyses of the Winchcombe meteorite, which was recovered only hours after its spectacular fireball lit up the skies over the U.K. in February 2021.

Health - Social Sciences - 15.11.2022
How should we navigate the next pandemic?
How should we navigate the next pandemic?
COVID-19 is the ninth pandemic, or large-scale epidemic, the world has experienced in the past century - and it won't be the last. To help the public and policymakers better navigate the next global outbreak, the University of Toronto has created the Institute for Pandemics (IFP) based at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.11.2022
Researchers identify SARS-CoV-2 variant in white-tailed deer, evidence of deer-to-human transmission
Researchers identify SARS-CoV-2 variant in white-tailed deer, evidence of deer-to-human transmission
In the summer of 2020, months after the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a global pandemic,  Samira Mubareka  and her colleagues began testing wildlife in Ontario and Quebec for the new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. "Pretty early in the pandemic, we knew that there was spillover from humans to animals," said Mubareka, who is a clinician scientist at Sunnybrook Research Institute and an associate professor in the department of laboratory medicine and pathobiology in the Temerty Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto.

Environment - 14.11.2022
New tool developed to monitor health of marine ecosystems and extinction risk of species
Scientists from Simon Fraser University are part of an international team of researchers that has developed a new science-based indicator to assess the state of health of the oceans-and the possible risk of extinction of their species. Recent biodiversity studies show an unprecedented loss of species, ecosystems and genetic diversity on land, but the extent to which these patterns are widespread in the oceans is not yet known.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 10.11.2022
A river runs beneath it: new study discovers a 460-km river under the Antarctica ice sheet
A river runs beneath it: new study discovers a 460-km river under the Antarctica ice sheet
The discovery of a 460 km river under the Antarctica ice sheet could be the missing link to climate models. A team of researchers led by Dr. Christine Dow, a professor in the department of Geography and Environmental Management and cross-appointed to the Department of Applied Mathematics, discovered the river from a series of airborne radar surveys and modelling.

Astronomy / Space - Physics - 10.11.2022
Scientists reconstruct gravity to better understand the universe
A Simon Fraser University physicist led an international team of scientists in reconstructing the laws of gravity-to gain a better understanding of how they work in the larger universe. The study, published in Nature Astronomy and featured in The Conversation , explored whether modifying General Relativity could help resolve some of the open problems of cosmology.

Astronomy / Space - Campus - 09.11.2022
Research could help astronauts eat well on future Mars missions
Research could help astronauts eat well on future Mars missions
Science, Health & Technology Lou Corpuz-Bosshart If space is the final frontier, it's food that will get us there in good shape, and UBC researchers are making sure that our food will be up to the task. Dr. John Frostad , an assistant professor in chemical and biological engineering who studies the science of food, leads a team that is creating new ways of encapsulating omega-3 fatty acids so that they can go the distance.

Health - 09.11.2022
Clinical trial examines optimal dialysis temperature
Clinical trial examines optimal dialysis temperature
Findings from a new trial suggest that lowering dialysis temperatures does not lead to improved patient outcomes, despite previous studies suggesting otherwise. Published in the Lancet , the four-year trial of more than 15,000 patients was done in 84 of 97 hemodialysis centres in Ontario, and, in terms of the number of patients, it was the largest hemodialysis trial ever published worldwide.

Microtechnics - 09.11.2022
Researchers help robots navigate crowded spaces with new visual perception method
A team of researchers at the University of Toronto has found a way to enhance the visual perception of robotic systems by coupling two different types of neural networks.

Health - 08.11.2022
A better understanding of how HIV-1 evades the immune system
The expression of the viral protein Vpu is essential in allowing infected cells to evade the elimination mechanism known as ADCC, a new study shows. The type of virus used as a model to study the efficacy of non-neutralizing antibodies against the virus responsible for AIDS has a crucial role to play, according to a new study led by Andrés Finzi, Université de Montréal professor and researcher at the CHUM Research Centre.

Life Sciences - 08.11.2022
How female false widow spiders use their ’spidey senses’ to attract mates - study
When it comes to spider love, female widow spiders hold the key to attracting mates, potentially adjusting their web-s attractiveness to lure males, according to new research. A study led by Simon Fraser University's resident -spider man,- PhD candidate Andreas Fischer, reveals new details about how female false widow spiders ( Steatoda grossa) communicate using pheromones-and suggests they can build more attractive webs- to lure mate-seeking males by adjusting the pH level of their pheromone-bearing silk.

Health - Environment - 08.11.2022
Low levels of air pollution deadlier than previously thought
Low levels of air pollution deadlier than previously thought
The World Health Organization's most recent estimates (2016) are that over 4.2 million people die prematurely each year due to long-term exposure to fine particulate outdoor air pollution (often referred to as PM 2. A recent study involving McGill researchers now suggests that the annual global death toll from outdoor PM 2.5 may be significantly higher than previously thought.

Health - 07.11.2022
Sleep quality associated with inflammatory markers of breast cancer
Sleep quality associated with inflammatory markers of breast cancer
Poor sleep quality is associated with breast inflammation, a condition that can activate cascades of reactions leading to cancer Poor sleep quality may promote inflammation of breast tissue and increase the risk of breast cancer, suggests an exploratory study published in the journal Cytokine . Indeed, the Laval University research team behind the study showed a correlation between sleep quality characteristics and certain inflammatory markers associated with breast cancer risk.

Health - Pharmacology - 07.11.2022
National study suggests it's time to rethink how we treat atrial fibrillation
National study suggests it’s time to rethink how we treat atrial fibrillation
Science, Health & Technology Brett Goldhawk Early intervention with catheter cryoablation can halt disease progression, reduce risk of serious health impacts A national study led by UBC researchers at the Centre for Cardiovascular Innovation is shedding light on how to more effectively treat atrial fibrillation (AF) - a common heart rhythm problem associated with increased risk of stroke and heart failure.