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Agronomy - Jun 30
Agronomy
Study shows that the more producers sell directly to consumers, the more they enjoy their work and the more economically satisfied they are. A major Leger survey has already revealed that dentists and hairdressers are among the happiest workers in Quebec. What about farmers? Sometimes they are really happy, for example in terms of recognition in society, sometimes it is very difficult in terms of remuneration.
Social Sciences - Jun 29
Social Sciences

A new study is the first to examine the connection between socioeconomic status and opioid incidents in Canada. The study reveals a connection between poverty and opioid-related hospitalization, emergency department visits and deaths in Canada. From 2000 to 2017, Canada's poorest residents were 3.8 times more likely to die of opioid-related causes than Canada's richest residents.

Health - Jun 28

By having study participants inhale polarized xenon gas while inside the MRI, the researchers see in real-time the function of the 300'500 million tiny alveolar sacs, which are responsible for delivering oxygen to the blood.

Health - Jun 28

Simon Fraser researchers are studying how a combination of genetics and brain MRIs may be used to predict the chances of developing Alzheimer's disease in the future.

Astronomy - Jun 28
Astronomy

The Near InfraRed Planet Searcher instrument, designed in part at Laval University, has successfully made its first observations.


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Agronomy / Food Science - Economics / Business - 30.06.2022
Happy at work, local farmers?
Happy at work, local farmers?
Study shows that the more producers sell directly to consumers, the more they enjoy their work and the more economically satisfied they are A major Leger survey has already revealed that dentists and hairdressers are among the happiest workers in Quebec. What about farmers? Sometimes they are really happy, for example in terms of recognition in society, sometimes it is very difficult in terms of remuneration.

Social Sciences - Health - 29.06.2022
Low-income Canadians are nearly four times more likely to die from opioids than the rich
Low-income Canadians are nearly four times more likely to die from opioids than the rich
A new study is the first to examine the connection between socioeconomic status and opioid incidents in Canada. The study reveals a connection between poverty and opioid-related hospitalization, emergency department visits and deaths in Canada. From 2000 to 2017, Canada's poorest residents were 3.8 times more likely to die of opioid-related causes than Canada's richest residents.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.06.2022
Combining genetics and brain MRI can aid in predicting chances of Alzheimer’s disease
Simon Fraser researchers are studying how a combination of genetics and brain MRIs may be used to predict the chances of developing Alzheimer's disease in the future. In a newly published study, researchers from SFU-s Functional and Anatomical Imaging & Shape Analysis Lab (FAISAL) identified distinct properties of brain MRIs and genetics that impact the prediction of Dementia of Alzheimer's Type, or DAT, for patients at various stages of the disease, then developed a biomarker that can help predict future conversion to DAT.

Health - 28.06.2022
Innovative lung-imaging technique shows cause of long-COVID symptoms
By having study participants inhale polarized xenon gas while inside the MRI, the researchers see in real-time the function of the 300'500 million tiny alveolar sacs, which are responsible for delivering oxygen to the blood. (Supplied photo/Paulina Wyszkiewicz) Many who experience what is now called 'long-COVID' report feeling brain fog, breathless, fatigued and limited in doing everyday things, often lasting weeks and months post-infection.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 28.06.2022
A new planet hunter is on the watch
A new planet hunter is on the watch
The Near InfraRed Planet Searcher instrument, designed in part at Laval University, has successfully made its first observations The Near InfraRed Planet Searcher (NIRPS) instrument, designed in part at the University of Montreal and Laval University, has successfully made its first observations. Installed on the European Southern Observatory's (ESO) 3.6-meter telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile, NIRPS' mission is to search for new exoplanets around stars in the solar neighborhood.

Environment - Computer Science - 28.06.2022
Is AI good or bad for the climate? It's complicated
Is AI good or bad for the climate? It’s complicated
As the world fights climate change, will the increasingly widespread use of artificial intelligence (AI) be a help or a hindrance? In a paper published this week in Nature Climate Change , a team of experts in AI, climate change, and public policy present a framework for understanding the complex and multifaceted relationship of AI with greenhouse gas emissions, and suggest ways to better align AI with climate change goals.

Life Sciences - 27.06.2022
Southern resident killer whales not getting enough to eat since 2018
Southern resident killer whales not getting enough to eat since 2018
The endangered southern resident killer whale population isn't getting enough to eat, and hasn't been since 2018, a new UBC study has determined. The animals have been in an energy deficit, averaged across spring, summer and fall, for six of the last 40 years-meaning the energy they get from food is less than what they expend.

Environment - Campus - 27.06.2022
Researchers study plants sprouting from century-old seeds uncovered during Toronto Port Lands excavation
Researchers study plants sprouting from century-old seeds uncovered during Toronto Port Lands excavation
At a Toronto Port Lands construction site on the city's waterfront, keen-eyed workers recently spotted plants that had sprouted from soil recently exposed by the removal of tonnes of earth. The plants were hard stem bulrush and cattails, which are commonly found in freshwater marshes. Because the plants grew from a patch of ground that had been seven metres below the surface for a century, conservationists concluded that they had grown from seeds buried when Ashbridges Bay Marsh at the mouth of the Don River was covered with landfill in the early 1900s.

Life Sciences - 27.06.2022
Pre-natal exposure to alcohol: fathers may be partly responsible
Pre-natal exposure to alcohol: fathers may be partly responsible
In male mice, alcohol consumption in the weeks preceding conception affects the transcription of genes important for fetal development Preventing fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) has traditionally been seen as a maternal responsibility, but a growing body of research suggests that fathers have a responsibility as well.

Environment - 24.06.2022
Climate change negatively impacting bumble bees: Study
Temperature changes have negatively impacted most species of bumble bees over the past 120 years, according to new research published this week in Biology Letters . The researchers note that changes in temperature had more of a negative impact than other factors - such as precipitation or floral resources.

Health - Social Sciences - 23.06.2022
Black people in the U.S. twice as likely to face coercion, unconsented procedures during birth
Black people in the U.S. twice as likely to face coercion, unconsented procedures during birth
Science, Health & Technology Brett Goldhawk Pregnant people of other minoritized racial identities also experience more pressure from providers Black people in the U.S. are twice as likely as white people to be coerced into procedures during perinatal and birth care, and to undergo them without their explicit consent, according to a new study by researchers at UBC's Birth Place Lab and the University of California San Francisco (UCSF).

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 23.06.2022
Mosquito-repellent paint? Researchers say slippery walls make it difficult for the biting insects to rest
Mosquito-repellent paint? Researchers say slippery walls make it difficult for the biting insects to rest
As the planet warms, outbreaks of mosquito-borne diseases are becoming more common around the world. Traditional solutions include bed nets or chemical treatment - but researchers at the University of Toronto's Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering are trying a new angle: mosquito-repellent paint.

Pharmacology - Health - 23.06.2022
Cannabis self-medication: a solution that may create problems
Cannabis self-medication: a solution that may create problems
Even if the evidence of the effectiveness of cannabis is still very scarce, Quebecers are self-prescribing products from this plant for health problems ranging from pain to shyness Anxiety, depression, insomnia, shyness, migraines, muscle spasms, pain, loss of appetite, loss of libido. These are some of the health problems for which Quebecers self-prescribe cannabis, even though no reliable scientific study has yet demonstrated its effectiveness for these uses.

Environment - 22.06.2022
Reducing air pollution can support healthy brain development: Study
A new study finds that having a portable air cleaner in the home can reduce the negative impacts of air pollution on brain development in children. Simon Fraser researchers collaborated with U.S. and Mongolian scientists to study the benefits of using air filters to reduce exposure to air pollution during pregnancy, and assessed the impact on children's intelligence.

Environment - Life Sciences - 22.06.2022
Researchers and Indigenous students learn about Grand River
Six Nations Polytechnic partners with McMaster University and the University of Waterloo to explore STEM field work in the Grand River By Staff On June 15, grade nine students from Six Nations Polytechnic (SNP) and the STEAM Academy program donned their waders to join researchers Charles de Lannoy , Karen Kidd and Waterloo Biology Professor Mark Servos to conduct experiments in the Grand River.

Life Sciences - Environment - 21.06.2022
A blueprint for life forms on Mars?
A blueprint for life forms on Mars?
The extremely salty, very cold, and almost oxygen-free environment under the permafrost of Lost Hammer Spring in Canada's High Arctic is the one that most closely resembles certain areas on Mars. So, if you want to learn more about the kinds of life forms that could once have existed - or may still exist - on Mars, this is a good place to look.

Health - 20.06.2022
Melanoma map shows skin cancer is on the rise in Canada
Melanoma map shows skin cancer is on the rise in Canada
Rates of melanoma, a deadly form of skin cancer, are on the rise in Canada. Those living in southern and coastal areas are most at risk, according to a new study led by McGill University. 'Cutaneous melanoma causes more deaths than any other skin cancer, accounting for 1.9 per cent of all cancer deaths in men and 1.2 per cent in women in Canada.

Physics - 16.06.2022
How wet chopsticks hitting hot oil advance our understanding of physics
How wet chopsticks hitting hot oil advance our understanding of physics
Researchers find the physics of frying food far more complex than anticipated By Cooks throughout Asia put moist bamboo chopsticks into oil in a frying pan, watching the bubbles that form and listening to the sizzling sound they make as they burst to gauge the perfect cooking temperature. An international team of researchers used the technique as inspiration to learn about the complex physics behind wet chopsticks hitting hot oil.

Economics / Business - Social Sciences - 15.06.2022
Vigilantes seeking justice can also spell trouble for workplaces
Vigilantes seeking justice can also spell trouble for workplaces
Q&As Collins Maina Vigilantes are known for taking matters into their own hands to informally punish misbehaviour, and a new collaborative study finds they may pose a challenge to businesses and workplaces. The study , co-authored by UBC Sauder School of Business Karl Aquino ( he/him ), looks into what makes vigilantes tick.

Health - Pharmacology - 15.06.2022
Opioid use disorder: flexible treatment at home proves effective
Opioid use disorder: flexible treatment at home proves effective
A pan-Canadian team announces initial results of the national OPTIMA study comparing the efficacy of two models of care for treating opioid use disorder. Did you know that more than 26,500 Canadians died from opioid intoxication between January 2016 and September 2021? Or that more than 350,000 people who used drugs containing opioids to relieve their pain did so problematically? In Quebec alone, 339 people died from opioid intoxication between January and September 2021, according to the latest data from the Public Health Agency of Canada.
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