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Psychology - Jan 27
Returning to in-person experiences in February: for more information. Struggles with mental health among family members exacerbate each other in a feedback loop COVID-19 disruptions in homes with two or more children affect one sibling more than the other, according to a new study. When caregivers are experiencing stress associated with the pandemic, many other areas of family life are disrupted-often with higher levels of mental-health struggle for children, including anger, anxiety, and depression.
Health - Jan 25

Researchers from the University of Toronto and University of Cambridge are looking into the ways ageism - prejudice against individuals based on age - can be encoded into technologies such as artificial intelligence, which many of us now encounter daily.

Health - Jan 24

Returning to in-person experiences in February: for more information. The computational models will help medical practitioners better understand the physiology of the kidneys during pregnancy Researchers are using computer simulations to better understand the impacts pregnancy can have on kidneys.

Health - Jan 25
Health

Twenty years- worth of surveys suggest that nearly one in ten sexually active men in 35 countries in sub-Saharan Africa have been clients of sex workers.

Sport - Jan 20

Returning to in-person experiences in February: for more information. New study findings can help coaches regulate individual training loads based on player position Researchers have linked the fitness of elite soccer players to the positions they play.


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Psychology - Health - 27.01.2022
When COVID-19 disrupts multi-child families, one sibling is affected more
Returning to in-person experiences in February: for more information. Struggles with mental health among family members exacerbate each other in a feedback loop COVID-19 disruptions in homes with two or more children affect one sibling more than the other, according to a new study. When caregivers are experiencing stress associated with the pandemic, many other areas of family life are disrupted-often with higher levels of mental-health struggle for children, including anger, anxiety, and depression.

Health - Innovation - 25.01.2022
Is AI ageist? Researchers examine impact of technology on older users
Researchers from the University of Toronto and University of Cambridge are looking into the ways ageism - prejudice against individuals based on age - can be encoded into technologies such as artificial intelligence, which many of us now encounter daily. This age-related bias in AI, also referred to as "digital ageism," is explored in a new paper led by Charlene Chu , an affiliate scientist at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute's KITE research arm, part of the University Health Network (UHN), and an assistant professor at the Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing.

Health - 25.01.2022
Men who paid for sex more likely to live with HIV
Men who paid for sex more likely to live with HIV
Twenty years- worth of surveys suggest that nearly one in ten sexually active men in 35 countries in sub-Saharan Africa have been clients of sex workers. These men are about 50 percent more likely to be living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), according to a team of international researchers, including Professor Mathieu Maheu-Giroux and Caroline Hodgins of McGill University.

Health - Mathematics - 24.01.2022
Computational models reveal effects of pregnancy on kidneys
Returning to in-person experiences in February: for more information. The computational models will help medical practitioners better understand the physiology of the kidneys during pregnancy Researchers are using computer simulations to better understand the impacts pregnancy can have on kidneys. The new research will help medical practitioners better understand the physiology of the kidneys during pregnancy and develop appropriate patient care and treatments to improve health outcomes.

Sport - Health - 20.01.2022
Aerobic fitness of elite soccer players linked to player positions
Returning to in-person experiences in February: for more information. New study findings can help coaches regulate individual training loads based on player position Researchers have linked the fitness of elite soccer players to the positions they play. The ability to make this assessment can help coaches regulate individual training loads based on player position, according to a recent study.

Health - 20.01.2022
Dementia: how to prevent cognitive decline
Dementia: how to prevent cognitive decline
Researchers at the UdeM-affiliated Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal have determined the optimal number of intervention sessions needed to prevent cognitive decline in people at risk. Physical activity, nutrition and cognitively stimulating activities are all known to be good ways to prevent Alzheimer's disease and dementia.

Psychology - 20.01.2022
Using cannabis does impair your brain
Using cannabis does impair your brain
An UdeM-led meta-review of scientific literature highlights several areas of cognition impaired by cannabis use, including problems concentrating and difficulties remembering and learning. Cannabis use leads to acute cognitive impairments that may continue beyond the period of intoxication, according to a systematic scientific review published today in Addiction and led by Alexandre Dumais , an associate clinical professor of psychiatry at Université de Montréal.

Life Sciences - 20.01.2022
Here's why whales don't drown when they gulp down food underwater
Here’s why whales don’t drown when they gulp down food underwater
Science, Health & Technology Alex Walls Ever wondered whether whales can burp, and why they don't drown when they gulp down gallons of water and krill? New UBC research may just hold the answer. Researchers found that lunge-feeding whales have an 'oral plug', a fleshy bulb in their mouths that moves backwards to seal off the upper airways during feeding, while their larynx closes to block the lower airways.

Life Sciences - Environment - 19.01.2022
Climate change projections, Parkinson’s pain, and mimicking the aorta
Environment Projecting climate change more accurately Scientists have been making projections of future global warming using powerful supercomputers for decades. But how accurate are these predictions? Modern climate models consider complicated interactions between millions of variables. They do this by solving a system of equations that attempt to capture the effects of the atmosphere, ocean, ice, land surface and the sun on the Earth's climate.

Environment - Life Sciences - 18.01.2022
Sunflowers' invisible colours help them attract bees and adapt to drought
Sunflowers’ invisible colours help them attract bees and adapt to drought
Science, Health & Technology Peter Meiszner It turns out sunflowers are more than just a pretty face: the ultraviolet colours of their flowers not only attract pollinators, but also help the plant regulate water loss, according to new UBC research. The dense collection of yellow petals of a sunflower (technically an 'inflorescence', or collection of many flowers) is a familiar sight, but it's hiding something from the human eye: an ultraviolet (UV) bullseye pattern, invisible to humans but not to most insects including bees.

Politics - 18.01.2022
Expert insight: Conspiracy without the theory
Conspiracy theories have mutated into conspiracism , a transformation marked by people rejecting proof and evidence in favour of frivolous speculation. That's what political scientists Russell Muirhead and Nancy Rosenblum suggest in their book A Lot of People are Saying . In short, conspiracism is conspiracy without the theory.

Health - 18.01.2022
Despite COVID-19, most young Canadian adults aren't smoking or drinking more
Despite COVID-19, most young Canadian adults aren’t smoking or drinking more
A Montreal-based longitudinal study finds few changes in alcohol, cannabis and nicotine use among 24- to 33-year-olds from before the pandemic to now. Long lines in front of liquor and pot outlets, tele-commuting workers worrying about their mental health, young parents trying to cope with home schooling - for two years now, the news has been full of people struggling with the COVID-19 pandemic.

Environment - Life Sciences - 18.01.2022
Uncovering the underlying patterns in contemporary evolution
Uncovering the underlying patterns in contemporary evolution
Wild populations must continuously adapt to environmental changes or risk extinction. For more than fifty years, scientists have described instances of -rapid evolution- in specific populations as their traits (phenotypes) change in response to varying stressors. For example, Spanish clover has developed a tolerance for copper from the mine tailings in which it grows, and the horn size of Alberta bighorn sheep has decreased due to trophy hunting.

Pharmacology - Environment - 17.01.2022
Researchers use AI to analyze tweets debating vaccination and climate change
Preparing for an online start to the winter term: for more information. Analyzing roughly 87 million tweets, researchers found sentiments around climate change to be uniform, but not so for vaccination Using artificial intelligence (AI) researchers have found that between 2007 and 2016 online sentiments around climate change were uniform, but this was not the case with vaccination.

Health - Environment - 17.01.2022
Disinfecting PPE for reuse, recycling
Returning to in-person experiences in February: for more information. Engineering prof Bill Anderson works with NZ researchers to reduce COVID-19 shortages, waste A professor at Waterloo Engineering collaborated with researchers in New Zealand on the development of a method to disinfect personal protective equipment (PPE) for reuse or recycling.

Criminology / Forensics - 17.01.2022
Spyware investigations involving University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab reveal targets in El Salvador, Poland: Reports
A joint investigation by the University of Toronto's Citizen Lab and Access Now reveals that dozens of journalists and activists in El Salvador had their cellphones allegedly hacked by Israeli firm NSO Group's Pegasus spyware.  John Scott-Railton The investigation, which identified 35 individuals whose phones were successfully infected with the sophisticated spyware normally used to target criminals, was reported on by the Associated Press , Reuters , the Guardian and other media outlets.

Materials Science - Health - 17.01.2022
Why are zebra mussels so sticky? Study could lead to new industrial coatings, medical adhesives
Why are zebra mussels so sticky? Study could lead to new industrial coatings, medical adhesives
A water tank full of coin-sized invertebrates may not be the first thing you'd expect to see in a materials science and engineering research lab. But Eli Sone , a professor in the department of materials science and engineering in the University of Toronto's Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering and the Institute of Biomedical Engineering, and his team have been studying both zebra and quagga mussels for years in the hope that they can help solve a diverse range of challenges.

Health - Pharmacology - 17.01.2022
Increasing the capacity of the immune system to kill cancer cells
Increasing the capacity of the immune system to kill cancer cells
UdeM cancer specialist André Veillette and his team at the IRCM unveil a promising approach using molecules found in macophages. Awakening the immune system's instinct for destroying cancer, using two molecules located on the surface of macrophages: that's the promising avenue opening up from recent laboratory work of Dr. André Veillette.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.01.2022
Protective gene variant against COVID-19 identified
Protective gene variant against COVID-19 identified
An international metastudy conducted by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, the Lady Davis Institute of the Jewish General Hospital in Canada and VA Boston Healthcare System in the U.S. has identified a specific gene variant that protects against severe COVID-19 infection. The researchers managed to pinpoint the variant by studying people of different ancestries; a feat they say highlights the importance of conducting clinical trials that include people of diverse descents.

Health - 13.01.2022
More Canadians may be driving high since cannabis legalization: UBC study
More Canadians may be driving high since cannabis legalization: UBC study
Science, Health & Technology Brett Goldhawk THC is being detected in twice as many injured drivers since cannabis was legalized in Canada, according to new UBC research published today in the New England Journal of Medicine . The findings may be a signal that more Canadians are choosing to drive after using cannabis.
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