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Health - Pharmacology - 12.02.2024
Can hydrogels help mend a broken heart?
Researchers design gel from wood pulp to heal damaged heart tissue and improve cancer treatments You can mend a broken heart this Valentine's Day now that researchers invented a new hydrogel that can be used to heal damaged heart tissue and improve cancer treatments. University of Waterloo chemical engineering researcher Dr. Elisabeth Prince teamed up with researchers from the University of Toronto and Duke University to design the synthetic material made using cellulose nanocrystals, which are derived from wood pulp.

Career - Pedagogy - 12.02.2024
An innovation engine: adapting a successful learning model
Applying the benefits from WE Accelerate work-integrated learning pilot for first-year co-op students to different learners By Matthew King Co-operative Education and Experiential Education In 2020, the negative impact of the global pandemic was particularly challenging for co-op students in their first work term.

Health - 12.02.2024
A new era in wound care
Hydrogels are engineered materials, which absorb and retain water and are currently used in various medical treatments, including dressing wounds. The problem with current hydrogels is that they adhere indiscriminately to all surfaces, which means that wound dressing can potentially damage delicate tissue as it is healing.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.02.2024
Making AI a partner in neuroscientific discovery
New paper argues that Large Language Models can reveal breakthroughs humans alone cannot The past year has seen major advances in Large Language Models (LLMs) such as ChatGPT. The ability of these models to interpret and produce human text sources (and other sequence data) has implications for people in many areas of human activity.

Health - 09.02.2024
Results for: National study seeks to close research gaps for kids with chronic gastrointestinal inflammation
Canada has among the highest rates of Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in the world, averaging a new IBD diagnosis every 48 minutes. The onset of paediatric IBD was found in more than nine children per 100,000 in 2023 according to the Crohn's and Colitis Canada 2023 Impact Report. Dr. Jennifer deBruyn, MD, is the co-chair of  the Canadian Children Inflammatory Bowel Disease Network (CIDsCaNN) and first author of a new study comparing two advanced treatment options for paediatric Crohn's disease, a type of IBD in children that she says needs further research.

Social Sciences - Environment - 08.02.2024
Surprising new evidence on happiness and wealth
Survey of people living in small, rural communities around the world suggests income not key to happiness Global polls typically show that people in industrialized countries where incomes are relatively high report greater levels of satisfaction with life than those in low-income countries. But now the first large-scale survey to look at happiness in small, non-industrialized communities living close to nature paints quite a different picture.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 07.02.2024
How life appeared: rise of the nanomachines
Chemists at UdeM explain how molecular systems at the origin of life may have evolved, a development that could lead to new and improved nanosystems. By attaching molecules together, scientists at Université de Montréal think they've found how molecular systems at the origin of life evolved to create complex self-regulating functions.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.02.2024
Results for: UCalgary researcher develops new tool to diagnose genetic mutations
Results for: UCalgary researcher develops new tool to diagnose genetic mutations
Dr. Pierre Billon, PhD, was frustrated with the time it took to get genetic analysis done at specialized private labs. Results of DNA samples that he needed for his research weren't available for weeks and sometimes months. Outsourcing to genome facilities was also expensive. Billon was convinced there was another approach that could provide results faster and in a more cost-effective way.

Pharmacology - Health - 06.02.2024
New eye drug may someday help diabetic patients
Scientists have developed an experimental medication called UBX1325, or foselutoclax, that shows promise in treating macular edema. Diabetes can lead to eye problems, and a common one is diabetic macular edema (DME), causing vision loss. Now a study published in Nature Medicine suggest a new experimental drug could someday help make treatment of DME more successful and longer-lasting.

Health - Environment - 06.02.2024
Are environmental toxins putting future generations at risk?
Exposure to DDT can trigger changes to the heritable sperm epigenome and may raise risk of birth defects and disease, finds McGill-led study In a study that signals potential reproductive and health complications in humans, now and for future generations, researchers from McGill University, the University of Pretoria, Université Laval, Aarhus University, and the University of Copenhagen, have concluded that fathers exposed to environmental toxins, notably DDT, may produce sperm with health consequences for their children.

Health - Environment - 06.02.2024
Are environmental toxins reducing men’s fertility?
Exposure to DDT can trigger changes to the heritable sperm epigenome and may raise risk of birth defects and disease, finds McGill-led study In a study that signals potential reproductive and health complications in humans, now and for future generations, researchers from McGill University, the University of Pretoria, Université Laval, Aarhus University, and the University of Copenhagen, have concluded that fathers exposed to environmental toxins, notably DDT, may produce sperm with health consequences for their children.

Health - Innovation - 06.02.2024
Fitness tracker for the brain
Local company aims to improve people's cognitive wellness with smart glasses By Charlotte Danby Faculty of Engineering Waterloo-based deep tech startup AdHawk Microsystems recently launched MindLink Air (TM), everyday glasses that can read its wearer's eye health and cognitive state using research-grade, camera-free eye-tracking technology.

Health - Social Sciences - 02.02.2024
How stigma hurts trans health
Researchers demonstrate a link between transgender people's exposure to gender-related stigma and cortisol, a key hormone in the stress response. For transgender and nonbinary people, feeling connected to one's community may alleviate the adverse health effects of chronic exposure to stigma, the latest findings of a U.S.-Canada study suggests.

Social Sciences - 01.02.2024
Who lives in rural Canada and who's most likely to move there?
Who lives in rural Canada and who’s most likely to move there?
A study by West ern researchers shows most newcomers - and the majority of Canadians - choose to live cities. It's a historical trend negatively impact smaller communities looking to counteract the effects of an aging population , declining birth rates and economic disparities the urban-rural divide.

Environment - Pharmacology - 30.01.2024
Medicinal drugs pollute the St. Lawrence River
Medicinal drugs pollute the St. Lawrence River
The 3,000-km artery contains a large quantity and variety of pharmaceutical compounds, some of which could be harmful to ecosystems and human health. A new study shows troubling levels of pharmaceutical pollution in the St. Lawrence River and its largest tributaries, especially near and downstream of urban areas.

Life Sciences - 30.01.2024
Some Canadians may still be at risk of Genetic Discrimination despite new federal law
McGill study finds that some Canadians may still be at risk of Genetic Discrimination despite new federal law New study from the Centre of Genomics and Policy examines the impact of the 2017 Genetic Non-Discrimination Act on life insurance practices and finds that the law falls short on protecting Canadians against Genetic Discrimination.

Health - Innovation - 29.01.2024
Better diagnosing diseases with the help of AI
Researchers improve the trustworthiness of medical imaging diagnoses with innovative three-stage system powered by AI An interdisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Waterloo has developed a more trustworthy method to diagnose diseases such as COVID-19, pneumonia, and melanoma using artificial intelligence (AI) tools.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.01.2024
Can ’coloured noise’ really improve our sleep?
In the never-ending quest for a good night's sleep, the use of white, brown or pink noise is the latest thing. Solution or illusion? One in four people suffer from some kind of sleep disorder-insomnia, sleep apnea, narcolepsy, hypersomnia, restless legs syndrome. And for a quarter of them, there is no effective, long-term solution.

Health - Life Sciences - 26.01.2024
Endangered fish can live longer after cataract surgery
According to a study led by UdeM veterinarian Claire Vergneau-Grosset, cataract operations can help fish survive and not get sick or die from lack of food they cannot see. Humans aren't the only species to develop cataracts with age. Some animals, including dogs, cats, horses and, it turns out, fish living in captivity, can also get cataracts as they grow older.

Environment - 25.01.2024
More reporting needed to show progress on Ontario municipal climate and sustainability plans
More reporting needed to show progress on Ontario municipal climate and sustainability plans
University of Waterloo researchers will help Canadian municipalities monitor, measure and achieve climate mitigation goals While sustainability reporting is a widespread practice in the private sector, new research shows that the same cannot be said for Ontario municipalities. Researchers at the University of Waterloo studied 38 municipalities in Ontario, representing more than two-thirds of the population, and discovered that almost all municipalities publish their sustainability and climate change goals, but under half are formally reporting on their progress.
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