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Results 21 - 40 of 216.


Health - Computer Science - 19.01.2023
AI-powered database to design potential cancer drug in 30 days
AI-powered database to design potential cancer drug in 30 days
In less than a month, researchers have used AlphaFold, an artificial intelligence (AI)-powered protein structure database, to design and synthesize a potential drug to treat hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common type of primary liver cancer. The researchers successfully applied AlphaFold to an end-to-end AI-powered drug discovery platform called Pharma.AI.

Environment - Architecture - 19.01.2023
Build more, pollute less: University of Toronto research centre tackles need for sustainable infrastructure
The newest research centre at the University of Toronto's Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering will develop innovative ways to meet the urgent and growing need for infrastructure - without further exacerbating the climate crisis. The Centre for the Sustainable Built Environment brings together seven researchers from across University of Toronto, as well as a dozen companies in construction and related industries.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 19.01.2023
A trail of dust from Africa to Antarctica
A trail of dust from Africa to Antarctica
An international research team including UdeM professor James King has shown that dust from southern Africa made its way to Antarctica within the last few thousand years. CONTENU - Until recently, the southern part of South America was believed to be the main source of the dust that lands in Antarctica.

Innovation - Computer Science - 18.01.2023
OneButtonPIN increases security for blind and low-vision tech users
New authentication method helps protect data from privacy attacks Working closely with blind and low-vision (BLV) users, researchers at the University of Waterloo and the Rochester Institute of Technology have developed a new authentication method that could help BLV technology users more securely access their devices.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.01.2023
Scientists developing early Alzheimer’s disease detection sensor
By Melissa Shaw Researchers with the SFU Nanodevice Fabrication Group are developing a new biosensor that can be used to screen for Alzheimer's disease and other diseases. An overview of their work has been recently published in the journal Nature Communications. Their sensor works by detecting a particular type of small protein, in this case a cytokine known as Tumour Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF alpha), which is involved with inflammation in the body.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.01.2023
Technologically assisted communication may impair brain development
Technologically assisted communication may impair brain development
According to an international study, the use of videoconferencing platforms such as Zoom and FaceTime has a negative effect on social cognition and its development. Videoconferencing services are proliferating-there's Zoom, Teams, Messenger, FaceTime, Skype, WhatsApp-and since the COVID-19 pandemic they have been seeing heavier use than ever before.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 17.01.2023
Science of sediment transport key to river conservation & protection: Researchers
Science of sediment transport key to river conservation & protection: Researchers
New research from SFU-s Jeremy Venditti dives into the science of going with the flow predicting the evolution of the Earth's surface. Researchers at Simon Fraser University (SFU) and The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have devised a better way to measure how fast sediment flows in rivers.

Health - 16.01.2023
Using machine learning to predict brain tumour progression
Waterloo researchers use MRI data to further personalize cancer medicine Researchers at the University of Waterloo have created a computational model to predict the growth of deadly brain tumours more accurately. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a brain cancer with an average survival rate of only one year.

Health - 16.01.2023
Smartphone app designed by University of Toronto researchers can significantly improve memory recall
Smartphone app designed by University of Toronto researchers can significantly improve memory recall
Researchers at the University of Toronto have demonstrated that a new smartphone application helps to significantly improve memory recall, which could prove beneficial for individuals in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease or other forms of memory impairment. Dubbed HippoCamera  for its ability to mimic the function of the brain's hippocampus in memory construction and retention, the app enhances the encoding of memories stored in the brain by boosting attention to daily events and consolidating them more distinctly - thus later enabling richer, more comprehensive recall.

Physics - Chemistry - 16.01.2023
Experimental physicists take step toward understanding natural quantum systems
Experimental physicists take step toward understanding natural quantum systems
"Suppose you knew everything there was to know about a water molecule - the chemical formula, the bond angle, etc.," says experimental physicist  Joseph Thywissen . "You might know everything about the molecule, but still not know there are waves on the ocean - much less how to surf them," he says.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 16.01.2023
Astronomers capture radio signal from distant galaxy
Astronomers capture radio signal from distant galaxy
How do stars form in distant galaxies? Astronomers have long been trying to answer this question by detecting radio signals emitted by nearby galaxies. However, these signals become weaker the further away a galaxy is from Earth, making it difficult for current radio telescopes to pick up. Now researchers from Montreal and India have captured a radio signal from the most distant galaxy so far at a specific wavelength known as the 21 cm line, allowing astronomers to peer into the secrets of the early universe.

Health - 13.01.2023
Water babies: is it time to demedicalize childbirth?
A recent study shows most women would give birth in water as long as it's safe for their baby, but despite the benefits very few hospital facilities now offer this option. CONTENU - Around 80 percent of women would be interested in giving birth in water, as long as the procedure poses no risks to their newborn.

Economics / Business - Health - 12.01.2023
Study refutes industry claims that ban on menthol cigarettes leads to increased use of illegal smokes
Study refutes industry claims that ban on menthol cigarettes leads to increased use of illegal smokes
A new research study has found that banning menthol cigarettes does not lead more smokers to purchase menthols from illicit sources, contradicting claims made by the tobacco industry that the proposed ban of menthol cigarettes in the U.S. by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will lead to a significant increase in illicit cigarettes.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.01.2023
Researchers uncover molecular vulnerability in childhood brain cancer, identify treatment
Researchers uncover molecular vulnerability in childhood brain cancer, identify treatment
A team of researchers from the University of Toronto's Donnelly Centre for Cellular & Biomolecular Research and McMaster University have made a potential breakthrough in medulloblastoma, a form of brain cancer that predominantly affects children and infants - a finding that could lead to new, targeted treatments that are less harmful to developing brains.

Pharmacology - Computer Science - 11.01.2023
AI to fast-track drug formulation development
AI to fast-track drug formulation development
In a bid to reduce the time and cost associated with developing promising new medicines, University of Toronto scientists have successfully tested the use of artificial intelligence to guide the design of long-acting injectable drug formulations. The study, published this week in  Nature Communication , was led by Professor  Christine Allen  in the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy and  Alán Aspuru-Guzik  in the departments of chemistry and computer science in the Faculty of Arts & Science.

Computer Science - 11.01.2023
Datagotchi: the voting-prediction tool keeps learning new things
Released in September during the Quebec provincial elections, the app analyzes people's lifestyles to give a better idea which party they'll cast their ballot for. CONTENU - People's everyday habits may not correlate perfectly with their voting behaviour. But the research team behind a made-in-Quebec app called Datagotchi has found a significant link between lifestyle and voting preference.

Environment - 11.01.2023
Significant reductions in global greenhouse gas emissions still possible
Significant reductions in global greenhouse gas emissions still possible
About a quarter of the world's electricity currently comes from power plants fired by natural gas. These contribute significantly to global greenhouse gas emissions (amounting to 10% of energy-related emissions according to the most recent figures from 2017) and climate change.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.01.2023
Western research leads to new understanding of how HIV hides itself in the body 
Western research leads to new understanding of how HIV hides itself in the body 
When the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infects a person's body, it permanently inserts its genetic material into the genome where it often remains dormant and barely detectable for years. A major obstacle in finding a cure for HIV has been solving the mystery of how this dormant pool of HIV-infected cells, also called HIV latency, is established.

Pharmacology - Health - 09.01.2023
’Vaccination deserts’ identified in northern, rural and French-speaking Ontario
Pharmacist-administered vaccination sites unevenly distributed across Ontario New research out of the University of Waterloo has identified "vaccination deserts" in parts of northern and rural Ontario and in locations where French is predominantly spoken. These areas have little to no access to pharmacist-administered vaccination sites for COVID vaccines or the flu shot.

Health - 09.01.2023
University of Toronto researchers to advise health providers on improving Ontario’s primary care system
With Canadian health-care systems in crisis,  Monica Aggarwal and her colleagues at the University of Toronto's Dalla Lana School of Public Health are working to advise health providers on building better integrated primary care systems - work she hopes will help realize real change in the sector.