news


Category

Years
2020 | 2021 | 2022 | 2023 |



Results 41 - 60 of 216.


Economics / Business - 09.01.2023
’Keeping up with the Joneses’
The inequality gap is increasing and so is conspicuous consumption By Wendy Philpott University Relations Our very human tendency to want to "keep up with the Joneses" is as apparent today as ever. In fact, research shows that over the past decade, conspicuous consumption has intensified in developed economies.

Social Sciences - Health - 09.01.2023
Building trust for experts
Talking about complex societal issues requires trusted experts to combat disinformation Faculty of Arts Dr. Ashley Rose Mehlenbacher is the Canada Research Chair in Science, Health and Technology Communication and leading expert on how communication practices shape how people engage with scientific and technical subject matters.

Social Sciences - 06.01.2023
Marital breakdown: social support is both very limited and very important for men
Marital breakdown: social support is both very limited and very important for men
While men who have experienced a separation often try to cope on their own, a qualitative study shows the importance of educating them to seek help "I couldn't see anything. I wasn't focused on my work, I was completely. I was like in the middle of the ocean, no fleet." This testimony from Antoine, 61, illustrates the distress that men can feel after a marital breakup.

Health - Pharmacology - 06.01.2023
Older cancer patients would benefit from geriatric assessment screening
A new study led by the University of Toronto and its partner institutions has found that older adults - who account for more than 70 per cent of cancer diagnoses - would benefit from undergoing a geriatric assessment screening before they start chemotherapy. The study, published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology and led by Martine Puts , an associate professor in the Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, examines whether the use of the geriatric assessment and management (GAM) model in cancer patients would show an improvement in their quality of life.

Innovation - 05.01.2023
AI tech exaggerates biases in facial age perception more than humans 
AI tech exaggerates biases in facial age perception more than humans 
Artificial intelligence is the future. In fact, it's already here. One of the latest advancements is using it for automatically estimating age based on a person's face, a technology used for determining who can enter a bar or potentially view age-restricted content online. But are there biases in AI processing? Researchers from Western University and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (Israel) tested a large sample of the prominent major AI technologies available today and found not only did they reproduce human biases in the recognition of facial age, but they exaggerated those biases.

Life Sciences - 05.01.2023
A new understanding of brain functionality may help treat those with memory impairment
A new understanding of brain functionality may help treat those with memory impairment
New research from the University of Toronto is providing valuable insight into how the brain works to retain memory - and it could help treat patients with memory impairment. Alexander Barnett , an assistant professor in the department of psychology in the Faculty of Arts & Science, and a team of researchers have found that a vital part of the brain that helps retain memory - the hippocampus - may have more dynamic interactions with the rest of the brain than previously thought.

Health - 05.01.2023
Women experiencing intimate partner violence three times more likely to contract HIV
Women experiencing intimate partner violence three times more likely to contract HIV
Women that experience recent intimate partner violence (IPV) are three times more likely to contract HIV, according to a new study led by McGill researchers. In regions like Sub-Saharan Africa, women face an intersecting epidemic of intimate partner violence and HIV. -Worldwide, more than one in four women experience intimate partner violence in their lifetime," says McGill University Professor Mathieu Maheu-Giroux , a Canada Research Chair in Population Health Modeling.

Environment - 03.01.2023
How do people use public parks? Researchers study cellphone data to understand green space use
How do people use public parks? Researchers study cellphone data to understand green space use
Managing public parks can be a balancing act - the more people enjoy them, the more wildlife is naturally damaged. But researchers at the University of Toronto say anonymous cellphone data could help urban planners strike a better balance between the needs of people and wildlife. Their study,  published in the journal  PLOS Computational Biology , is among the first to use anonymous GPS data from smartphones to track how people interact with green spaces, potentially impacting biodiversity.

Environment - Innovation - 03.01.2023
Self-powered, printable smart sensors created from emerging semiconductors could mean cheaper, greener Internet of Things
Creating smart sensors to embed in our everyday objects and environments for the Internet of Things (IoT) would vastly improve daily life-but requires trillions of such small devices. Simon Fraser University professor Vincenzo Pecunia believes that emerging alternative semiconductors that are printable, low-cost and eco-friendly could lead the way to a cheaper and more sustainable IoT.

Environment - Life Sciences - 02.01.2023
Most species evolve by adapting to similar, large-scale environmental pressures
Most species evolve by adapting to similar, large-scale environmental pressures
Since the days of Charles Darwin, evolutionary biologists have widely believed that most new species form because they've adapted to different environments - but a new University of Toronto study suggests otherwise. The study, published in the journal  Science ,  sheds light on what researchers have dubbed a "blind spot" in our understanding of why new species form.

Chemistry - Environment - 21.12.2022
A process to produce fuel from banana peel
A process to produce fuel from banana peel
This green process could be used to valorize other food remains rich in cellulose or lignin The banana is an excellent source of energy, nutritionists will tell you unanimously. So is the peel, according to Marie-Josée Dumont, but in the fuel sense of the term. The professor from the Department of Chemical Engineering at Laval University and her colleagues at McGill University have just taken a new step towards a fuel based on banana peel by substantially improving the efficiency of an existing chemical process.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.12.2022
Cannabis use in adolescents linked with anxiety, memory loss 
Cannabis use in adolescents linked with anxiety, memory loss 
Research finds chronic adolescent cannabis exposure may harm emotional and cognitive brain development through impact on separate brain regions   Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry researchers have shown that chronic exposure during adolescence to tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive component of cannabis, may induce long-lasting memory impairments and increased anxiety levels.

Health - 20.12.2022
Tiny patch would give diabetics painless glucose monitoring
University of Waterloo  researchers are developing a new patch that would offer diabetics an affordable, accurate, pain-free, round-the-clock alternative to traditional tests that require pricking a finger for a blood sample every few hours. University of Waterloo  researchers are developing a new patch that would offer diabetics an affordable, accurate, pain-free, round-the-clock alternative to traditional tests that require pricking a finger for a blood sample every few hours.

Criminology / Forensics - Social Sciences - 20.12.2022
Sex offenders: 70% drop in recidivism rate
Study led by Professor Patrick Lussier shows significant decline in recidivism of sex crimes in Canada over 80 years Encouraging news: between 1940 and 2019, the recidivism rate of sex offenders in this country has dropped by nearly 70%, according to a study published in the journal Criminology and Public Policy .

Life Sciences - Health - 20.12.2022
Found: a protective probiotic for ALS
Scientists at the CRCHUM find that a bacterium called Lacticaseibacillus rhamnosus HA-114 prevents neurodegeneration in the C. elegans worm used to study amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. CONTENU - A probiotic bacterium called Lacticaseibacillus rhamnosus HA-114 prevents neurodegeneration in the C. elegans worm , an animal model used to study amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

History / Archeology - 20.12.2022
Looking for a faster way to learn a language? Try historical linguistics
In recent years, language-learning apps, websites, and podcasts have exploded in popularity, promising fun and faster ways to make us fluent. But a new study conducted by UBC English James Stratton finds that one of the best ways of fast-tracking your language acquisition may be to learn a bit of language history - at least when it comes to learning a historically related language.

Chemistry - Computer Science - 16.12.2022
Using quantum-inspired computing, University of Toronto Engineering and Fujitsu discover improved catalyst for clean hydrogen
Using quantum-inspired computing, University of Toronto Engineering and Fujitsu discover improved catalyst for clean hydrogen
Researchers from the University of Toronto's Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering and  Fujitsu  have developed a new way of searching through 'chemical space' for materials with desirable properties. The technique has resulted in a promising new catalyst material that could help lower the cost of producing clean hydrogen.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.12.2022
A ’muscular’ response to regeneration
Therapies to target neuromuscular disorders affecting million of people worldwide are on the horizon thanks to research at the Montreal Clinical Research Institute of Montreal. CONTENU - Neuromuscular disorders affect millions of people worldwide. Now a discovery made at the Montreal Clinical Research Institute of Montreal (IRCM) opens the door to the development of targeted therapies.

Health - 15.12.2022
Aspirin and pre-eclampsia prevention: the earlier the better
Aspirin and pre-eclampsia prevention: the earlier the better
The efficacy and safety of taking aspirin before the eleventh week of pregnancy have not been demonstrated for this gestational problem, which affects about 5% of women Preeclampsia is a problem of pregnancy hypertension that increases the risk of premature delivery and leads to the death of approximately 60,000 women and 500,000 children worldwide each year, mainly in developing countries.

Campus - Environment - 15.12.2022
Engineers want to save whales from drowning...in noise
Engineers want to save whales from drowning...in noise
Science, Health & Technology Lou Corpuz-Bosshart Chronic ship noise can lead to stress, hearing loss and feeding problems for marine mammals like whales, dolphins and porpoises. UBC researchers are diving in to help address the issue. According to project lead Dr. Rajeev Jaiman , an associate professor in the department of mechanical engineering, propeller noise accounts for much of the acoustic barrage from ships.