news


Category

Years
2020 | 2021 | 2022 | 2023 |



Results 61 - 80 of 216.


Sport - Health - 15.12.2022
Can restricting blood flow to athletes' limbs while training boost performance? University of Toronto researchers investigate
Can restricting blood flow to athletes’ limbs while training boost performance? University of Toronto researchers investigate
Can restricting blood flow to athletes' limbs while training boost performance? University of Toronto researchers investigate Ischemic preconditioning (IPC), a technique used to prepare an organ or tissue for a lack of blood or oxygen supply, was originally developed for use in clinical settings where there is an expected lack of blood and oxygen supply, for example during surgery or after an adverse event like a heart attack.

Astronomy / Space Science - 15.12.2022
Two exoplanets may be mostly water
Two exoplanets may be mostly water
A team led by UdeM astronomers has found evidence that two exoplanets orbiting a red dwarf star are "water worlds," planets where water makes up a large fraction of the volume. These worlds, located in a planetary system 218 light-years away in the constellation Lyra, are unlike any planets found in our solar system.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.12.2022
Frequent genetic cause of late-onset ataxia uncovered by a Quebec-led international collaboration
Discovery will improve diagnosis and open treatment possibilities for thousands of people with this debilitating neurodegenerative condition worldwide New England Journal of Medicine reports the identification of a previously unknown genetic cause of a late-onset cerebellar ataxia, a discovery that will improve diagnosis and open new treatment avenues for this progressive condition.

Economics / Business - Psychology - 15.12.2022
Bots with feelings: Study explores how human customers react to AI chatbots with emotions
Artificial intelligence chatbots that show positive feelings - such as adding an -I am excited to do so!- or a few exclamation marks - do not necessarily translate into positive reactions or contribute to higher customer satisfaction, according to a recent study by researchers from the University of South Florida, the Georgia Institute of Technology and McGill University.

Health - 14.12.2022
New study uncovers negative effects of vaping
New study uncovers negative effects of vaping
Researchers at the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry and Lawson Health Research Institute have shown that vaping has a negative effect on a critical layer in the lungs and may harm lung function. The study, published in the PLOS ONE Journal , shows that vaping affects pulmonary surfactant - a layer in the lungs made up of lipids and proteins that allows people to breathe with minimal effort by reducing surface tension.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.12.2022
From COVID-19 to the common cold: UBC scientists identify broadly effective, infection-halting compound
From COVID-19 to the common cold: UBC scientists identify broadly effective, infection-halting compound
Science, Health & Technology Brett Goldhawk Researchers at UBC's Life Sciences Institute have identified a compound that shows early promise at halting infections from a range of coronaviruses, including all variants of SARS-CoV-2 and the common cold. The findings, published this week in Molecular Biomedicine , reveal a potential path toward antiviral treatments that could be used against many different pathogens.

Life Sciences - 14.12.2022
Brain stimulation improves reading ability in macular degeneration patients
A new study is the first to show brain stimulation improves reading in patients with macular degeneration. Drug treatments only slow down the progression of the disease, but Waterloo scientists discovered they could train the brain to use the information it receives more efficiently. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive, painless brain stimulation treatment that uses direct electrical currents to stimulate specific parts of the brain.

Pharmacology - Health - 14.12.2022
Class of diabetes drugs cuts dementia risk in older adults
A class of medication for Type 2 diabetes may help older people with the condition reduce their risk of dementia. The findings are contained in a new study by Walter Swardfager , an assistant professor of pharmacology and toxicology at the Temerty Faculty of Medicine and a scientist in the Sandra Black Centre for Brain Resilience and Recovery at Sunnybrook Research Institute, and graduate student Che-Yuan (Joey) Wu.

Environment - 14.12.2022
The hidden secrets of flowers
The hidden secrets of flowers
To better understand the evolution of flowers, researchers from Montreal are harnessing photogrammetry - a technique commonly used by geographers to reconstruct landscape topography. This is the first time scientists have used the technique to study flowers. The team, including researchers from McGill University, Université de Montréal, and the Montreal Botanical Garden, published the results of their work in the journal New Phytologist .

Computer Science - 13.12.2022
Should you believe your eyes? Not necessarily in virtual reality says new study
Should you believe your eyes? Not necessarily in virtual reality says new study
A recent study by Western neuroscientists suggests that, unlike true reality, perception in virtual reality is more strongly influenced by our expectations than the visual information before our eyes. The researchers point to the challenge of online shopping, where customers sometimes mis-estimate the size of a product based on their expectations, discovering for example that a sweater purchased online is indeed lovely but sized for a doll not an adult.

Environment - 13.12.2022
Methane from manholes and historic landfills: significant sources of gas go unrecognized
Methane from manholes and historic landfills: significant sources of gas go unrecognized
Cities are responsible for almost 1/5 of the global methane emissions caused by human activities. But most cities don't capture information about the full range of sources of this powerful greenhouse gas. In 2020, a team led by McGill University, measured methane emissions from various sources across the city of Montreal.

Agronomy / Food Science - Life Sciences - 13.12.2022
Intensive agriculture turned a wild plant into a pervasive weed
Intensive agriculture turned a wild plant into a pervasive weed
New research published in Science shows how the rise of modern agriculture turned a North American native plant, common waterhemp, into a problematic agricultural weed. An international team led by researchers at the University of British Columbia with colleagues at the University of Toronto, compared 187 waterhemp samples from modern farms and neighbouring wetlands with more than 100 historical samples dating as far back as 1820 that had been stored in museums across North America.

Astronomy / Space Science - 12.12.2022
'Unexpected' space traveller defies theories about origin of Solar System
’Unexpected’ space traveller defies theories about origin of Solar System
Researchers from Western have shown that a fireball that originated at the edge of the Solar System was likely made of rock, not ice, challenging long-held beliefs about how the Solar System was formed. Just at the edge of our Solar System and halfway to the nearest stars is a collection of icy objects sailing through space, known as the Oort Cloud.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.12.2022
Life and death of an 'altruistic' bacterium
Life and death of an ’altruistic’ bacterium
A new study led by Yves Brun shows how some bacteria living in a biofilm sacrifice themselves to ensure the survival of the community. CONTENU - Biofilms, complex communities of bacteria, abound around us: on the surface of cheese where they give off flavors and aromas, in streams where they form the slimy substance on rocks, on our teeth where they form plaque.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.12.2022
New branch on tree of life includes 'lions of the microbial world'
New branch on tree of life includes ’lions of the microbial world’
Science, Health & Technology Alex Walls There's a new branch on the tree of life and it's made up of predators that nibble their prey to death. These microbial predators fall into two groups, one of which researchers have dubbed "nibblerids” because they, well, nibble chunks off their prey using tooth-like structures.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 07.12.2022
The three dimensions of a flower
The three dimensions of a flower
Montreal biologists publish a study demonstrating that photogrammetry allows rapid and precise three-dimensional reconstruction of flowers from two-dimensional images. CONTENU - To better understand the evolution of flowers, a research team in biology from Université de Montréal, the Montreal Botanical Garden and McGill University have succeeded in using photogrammetry to quickly and precisely build, in three dimensions, a model of a flower from two-dimensional images.

Mechanical Engineering - 06.12.2022
Solving a messy problem
Engineering researchers make a media splash with sleek new 'splash-free' urinal design By Brian Caldwell Faculty of Engineering Engineering researchers at the University of Waterloo followed their curiosity and called on nature for inspiration for a new urinal design that has attracted internatinal attention by solving the messy problem of splash-back.

Health - 06.12.2022
What AI-generated COVID news tells us that journalists don't
What AI-generated COVID news tells us that journalists don’t
AI can help identify biases in news reporting that we wouldn't otherwise see. Researchers from McGill University got a computer program to generate news coverage of COVID-19 using headlines from CBC articles as prompts. They then compared the simulated news coverage to the actual reporting at the time and found that CBC coverage was less focused on the medical emergency and more positively focused on personalities and geo-politics.

Health - 01.12.2022
Prostate cancer: advances in hormone therapy resistance
Prostate cancer: advances in hormone therapy resistance
Researchers identify genes and markers associated with resistance to a commonly used hormone treatment Researchers at Laval University have discovered markers and genes associated with resistance to a hormone treatment commonly given to people with prostate cancer. These advances, reported in an article published by NAR Cancer , could lead to better use of this treatment and the development of new, more effective cancer treatments.

Health - Social Sciences - 01.12.2022
Researchers analyze hair to study war trauma among Syrian refugee children   
Researchers analyze hair to study war trauma among Syrian refugee children   
There's more to a strand of hair than meets the eye. This human tissue is a chronological record-keeper of the adversities endured by the human body and mind. A new study co-authored by researchers at Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry's Drug Safety Lab analyzes the relationship between war exposure, current living conditions, hair cortisol concentrations (HCC) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms.