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Health - Campus - 03.10.2022
Monkeypox studies suggest ways to reduce viral spread
Less than three months since it launched, the  monkeypox rapid research response  led by the University of Toronto's  Emerging and Pandemic Infections Consortium  (EPIC) and three partner hospitals is generating results that could help curb transmission of the virus. "When monkeypox first arrived in Canada, we quickly learned about the stockpile of smallpox vaccine [which also protects against monkeypox]," said  Jesse Knight , a PhD candidate in University of Toronto's Institute of Medical Science in the Temerty Faculty of Medicine.

Health - Environment - 03.10.2022
Ambient noise associated with increased risk of stroke
A study supervised by Audrey Smargiassi of UdeM has found that environmental noise is associated with increased risk of stroke among people aged 45 and over in the Montreal area. Every 10-decibel (dBA) increase in outdoor noise raises the risk of stroke by 6% for people aged 45 and over living in the Montreal area.

Social Sciences - 30.09.2022
What do the slogans at demonstrations tell us?
What do the slogans at demonstrations tell us?
Sociologist and UdeM professor Cécile Van de Velde has analyzed text from seven major protests around the world to understand the voices of contemporary social movements. We see them on banners, hand-held signs, walls, clothing, bodies and faces: words are central to social protest. Every slogan-collective or individual, printed or handwritten, demand or rallying cry-conveys a political message and an expression of anger.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 30.09.2022
The surprising Swiss-Army-knife-like functions of a powerful enzyme
The surprising Swiss-Army-knife-like functions of a powerful enzyme
Blue-green algae (AKA cyanobacteria) have a superpower which likely helps them be highly successful as invaders of waterways. They have an extraordinary ability to store energy and nitrogen in their cells for times of need. But how exactly they do so remains only partly understood. Now researchers from McGill University and their collaborators at ETH Zurich have uncovered an intriguing hitherto unknown ability of the enzymes (known as cyanophycin synthetases) that are active in creating these food reserves.

Psychology - 29.09.2022
Insecure attachment may be detrimental to the sexual well-being of long-term couples
A study has found that attachment insecurity affects sexual well-being in long-term couples. Among other things, it can shape people's motives for having sex. CONTENU - What motivates people in long-term relationships to have sex and how do those motives affect the emotions they experience during sex? Noémie Beaulieu, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Psychology at the University of Montreal, and her fellow researchers wanted to find out.

Psychology - Health - 28.09.2022
Not pursuing your goals during the pandemic is good for your mental health
Being able to let go of goals is a critical part of staying mentally healthy People who shelved their long-term goals during the pandemic were better able to avoid anxiety and depression, according to a new study. Researchers at the University of Waterloo aimed to investigate the relationship between what they call COVID-frozen goals - goals for which progress has been disrupted due to COVID-19 - and psychological well-being.

Environment - 28.09.2022
Researchers identify mechanism responsible for temperature and salinity ’staircases’ in Arctic Ocean
Researchers at the University of Toronto have identified the mechanism responsible for the formation of temperature and salinity "staircases" in the Arctic Ocean, resolving a mystery that has confounded oceanographers and climatologists alike for more than half a century. Understanding how these vertical structures work promises to shed more light on the causes and consequences of rapid Arctic sea ice loss amid climate change.

Environment - Innovation - 28.09.2022
A new window into plants of the past
A new window into plants of the past
Researchers from Université de Montréal and the University of Minnesota have developed a fast, nondestructive way of estimating how millions of dried plant specimens interacted with their environment. CONTENU - Within the cabinets and drawers of the world's herbaria are nearly 400 million dried plant specimens.

Earth Sciences - Chemistry - 28.09.2022
Predicting the next volcanic eruption, plus other stories
Predicting the next volcanic eruption, plus other stories
Predicting the next volcanic eruption Volcanic eruptions can be tricky to predict. Magma stored below volcanoes contains dissolved gases, including carbon dioxide, which escape to the surface and can be sampled at different times (before, after or during) an eruption to provide clues about the next one.

Health - 27.09.2022
New study adds to evidence that bans of menthol cigarettes help smokers to quit
Findings support proposed menthol bans in the U.S. and other countries A new study concludes that the 2020 European ban on menthol cigarettes made it more likely that menthol smokers would quit smoking, supporting previous Canadian research on the positive public health impact of banning menthol cigarettes.

Career - Health - 26.09.2022
Improving workplace injury compensation requires input from vulnerable workers
The study's findings can help workers' compensation systems communicate more effectively with injured workers Understanding the ways in which workers in precarious employment react to work injury and claims processes they see as unfair can help employers, legal representatives, physicians and others respond appropriately, according to a new study.

Social Sciences - History / Archeology - 26.09.2022
Bringing up baby, 10,000 years ago
Bringing up baby, 10,000 years ago
Further finds from an infant burial in Italy provides insights on the use of baby carriers and family heirlooms in prehistory, an UdeM-led study reveals. CONTENU - It seems logical enough: even in their earliest history, humans must have needed something to carry their babies around in as they moved from place to place.

Health - 23.09.2022
COVID-19 lockdown may have accelerated HIV transmission in some at-risk populations
COVID-19 lockdown may have accelerated HIV transmission in some at-risk populations
Science, Health & Technology Brett Goldhawk A new study led by researchers at UBC and the BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS (BC-CfE) is shedding light on how COVID-19 pandemic restrictions impacted another long-standing public health threat - HIV. The study, published in the Lancet Regional Health - Americas , examined HIV transmission during B.C.'s initial COVID-19 lockdown (March 22 to May 20, 2020) when stringent public health measures reduced social interactions and curtailed access to critical health services.

Paleontology - 22.09.2022
Fossil algae, dating from 541 million years ago, offer new insights into the plant kingdom's roots
Fossil algae, dating from 541 million years ago, offer new insights into the plant kingdom’s roots
Paleontologists have identified a new genus and species of algae called  Protocodium sinense  that predates the origin of land plants and modern animals and provides new insight into the early diversification of the plant kingdom. Discovered at a site in China, the 541-million-year-old fossil is the first and oldest green alga from this era to be preserved in three dimensions, enabling the researchers to investigate its internal structure and identify the new specimen with unprecedented accuracy.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.09.2022
A new understanding of the neurobiology of impulsivity
A new understanding of the neurobiology of impulsivity
While not all impulsive behaviour speaks of mental illness, a wide range of mental health disorders which often emerge in adolescence, including depression and substance abuse, have been linked to impulsivity. So, finding a way to identify and treat those who may be particularly vulnerable to impulsivity early in life is especially important.

Veterinary - 20.09.2022
New canine lab seeks four-legged research participants
Research aims to investigate dog cognition and therapy dog programs A new lab at UBC's Vancouver campus is looking for research participants-and not just anyone will do. The criteria? Must be furry and four-legged. Enjoy belly rubs and yummy treats? That's a bonus, too. The new Human-Animal Interaction Lab at UBC has officially opened and will soon be inviting pet dogs and their owners to engage in canine cognition research.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.09.2022
Quebec study on long COVID seeking participants
Purpose is to understand post-COVID symptom evolution and impact on patients- lives As of Sept. 20, 2022, there have been more than 1.1 million cases of COVID-19 in Quebec. It is estimated that 10 to 30 per cent of cases will have lingering symptoms after the acute illness. This means that as many as 330,000 Quebecers may experience what's become known as long COVID, or post-COVID-19 syndrome.

Life Sciences - 19.09.2022
How the brain develops: a new way to shed light on cognition
Researchers at Mila and IVADO introduce a new neurocomputational model of the human brain that could bridge the gap in understanding AI and the biological mechanisms underlying mental disorders. CONTENU - A new study introduces a new neurocomputational model of the human brain that could shed light on how the brain develops complex cognitive abilities and advance neural artificial intelligence research.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.09.2022
Exercise may be key to developing treatments for rare movement disorder
Exercise may be key to developing treatments for rare movement disorder
Spinal cerebellar ataxia 6 (SCA6) is an inherited neurological condition which has a debilitating impact on motor coordination. Affecting around 1 in 100,000 people, the rarity of SCA6 has seen it attract only limited attention from medical researchers. To date, there is no known cure and only limited treatment options exist.

Health - Physics - 15.09.2022
Researchers explore use of light-activated treatment to target wider variety of cancers
Researchers explore use of light-activated treatment to target wider variety of cancers
Chemotherapy drugs can be lifesaving - but they don't work for all patients or for all cancers. That's why a team of researchers at the University of Toronto Mississauga is looking at new ways to use special types of light to target cancer cells resistant to current drug therapy - an approach that might be easier on some patients than traditional chemotherapy.