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Materials Science - 24.10.2022
Penguin feathers may hold an effective anti-icing solution
Penguin feathers may hold an effective anti-icing solution
McGill University research team develops chemical-free solution that could be used to de-ice electrical wires, wind turbines and even airplane wings In 1998, ice build-up on electrical towers and wires caused the ice storm that paralyzed eastern Canada and the northeastern United States, leaving many people in the dark and cold for days and even weeks.

Health - 21.10.2022
Genomic data can improve pandemic modelling, SFU researchers say
Simon Fraser researchers are advocating for the inclusion of genomic data into forecasting models to better understand the spread of infectious diseases. The researchers say incorporating this data into forecasting models can inform monitoring, coordination and help determine where resources are needed.

Environment - Chemistry - 21.10.2022
Seawater: memory keeper, energy source, and pollution tracking
Sampling seawater just below the surface of a seagrass bed in Quatsino Sound, British Columbia. Credit: Mike McDermid What can a bottle of seawater tell you about the fish living below? Seawater holds -memories- in the form of DNA from fish and invertebrates that have recently passed by. This information, called environmental DNA or eDNA, can be used by scientists to track species across space.

Economics / Business - 20.10.2022
Systemic gender barriers mean going it alone may not be the answer for all new women entrepreneurs in Canada
Gender-equal ownership can help women overcome the systemic barriers their new businesses face A new study reveals that inexperienced entrepreneurial women in Canada still see more success when partnering with experienced men than when partnering with experienced women or going it alone. That is the key finding from research coming out of the University of Waterloo and Statistics Canada based on an analysis of 183,358 unique Canadian business ventures from 2006 to 2017 and the impact of co-ownership by women and men.

Campus - Health - 20.10.2022
Activity ’snacks’ following meals may help maintain muscle mass: Study
Interrupting prolonged sitting with periodic activity "snacks" may help maintain muscle mass and quality, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Toronto. Daniel Moore , an associate professor of muscle physiology at the Faculty of Kinesiology & Physical Eduction (KPE) who led the study, found that short bouts of activity, such as two minutes of walking or body weight sit-to-stand squats, allow the body to use more amino acids from meals to build muscle proteins.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.10.2022
Unlocking the mysteries of tauopathies: a protein that gives hope
A protein called 'numb' acts as a regulator of intracellular tau levels - and could someday be used to treat neurogenerative diseases, an UdeM-IRCM study finds. CONTENU - A mechanism has been found that controls cellular levels of tau, a protein whose abnormal accumulation is at the root of tauopathies, a class of devastating neurodegenerative diseases.

Psychology - 18.10.2022
Transparent face masks restore emotional understanding, but not empathy
Transparent face masks restore emotional understanding, but not empathy
Mask-wearing has become the norm for many since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. Despite their effectiveness in preventing the spread of viruses, opaque masks impair our ability to understand and convey emotions, a group of McGill researchers has found. McGill researchers Jelena Ristic , Full Professor in the Department of Psychology, and Sarah McCrackin , Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Psychology, discuss whether transparent masks reduce the negative impacts on social communication.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.10.2022
Researchers shrink brain tumours with gold nanoparticles, develop ’mini brains’ to study psychiatric disorders
Researchers at the University of Toronto are inching closer to realizing a life-saving brain cancer treatment by using gold nanoparticles to make radiation therapy more effective and less toxic for patients. In their battle against glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a rare, fast-growing cancer that begins in the brain, the multidisciplinary team has discovered that the nanoparticles can keep radiation tightly focused on the tumour, shrinking its size and preventing damage elsewhere in the body.

Health - 18.10.2022
Lethality of air pollution in India may be overestimated
High levels of exposure to air pollution in India have a smaller effect on mortality than previously estimated, according to a study that covered the entire country. Prabhat Jha The nationwide study - published in  Environmental Health Perspectives by Prabhat Jha , a scientist at Unity Health Toronto and a University Professor at the University of Toronto's Dalla Lana School of Public Health, as well as his colleagues - linked concentrations of PM2.5 derived from satellite-based measurements of deaths in over 7,400 small areas among seven million people.

Health - Psychology - 18.10.2022
COVID-19 effects on cognition
COVID-19 effects on cognition
A new long-term study led by neuroscientists at Western University shows short-term symptoms from COVID-19, like laboured breathing, fever, and dry cough, may just be the proverbial tip of the iceberg. The findings, published by Cell Reports Medicine , reveal short and possible long-term cognitive impairments among people who had COVID-19.

Environment - 17.10.2022
Climate change: trees expected to migrate at slow speed in the boreal forest
Climate change: trees expected to migrate at slow speed in the boreal forest
If the past is any indication, the face of the boreal forest will not change dramatically in the coming decades Boreal forest trees are sensitive to climate change, but their migration in response to temperature fluctuations is not at a gallop. That's according to a study published today in the journal PNAS (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States), where a research team calculated how fast jack pine and black spruce moved north after the last ice age.

Health - Social Sciences - 17.10.2022
Some screen time better than none during children’s concussion recovery
Arts & Humanities Erik Rolfsen (Dr. Noah Silverberg) Too much screen time can slow children's recovery from concussions, but new research from UBC and the University of Calgary suggests that banning screen time is not the answer. The researchers looked for links between the self-reported screen time of more than 700 children aged 8-16 in the first 7-10 days following an injury, and symptoms reported by them and their caregivers over the following six months.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.10.2022
Researcher combines AI and microelectronics to create neural implants that fight brain disorders
Researcher combines AI and microelectronics to create neural implants that fight brain disorders
Neural implants can help treat brain disorders such as Parkinson's disease and epilepsy by directly modulating abnormal activities - and the University of Toronto's  Xilin Liu  is working with microelectronics and artificial intelligence to make this emerging technology both safer and smarter. "Neurons talk to each other in part via electrical signals, and a therapeutic neural implant produces electrical stimulation - like a pacemaker for the brain," says Liu, an assistant professor in the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering.

Social Sciences - 17.10.2022
University of Toronto researcher sheds new light on accusations against medieval poet Chaucer: New York Times
Long-held assumption about 14 -century English poet Geoffrey Chaucer are being challenged by new research co-led by the University of Toronto's Sebastian Sobecki and covered by The New York Times .

Health - 13.10.2022
Hybrid work, more holistic approach, better for mental health
Hybrid work, more holistic approach, better for mental health
Hybrid work is better for worker mental health compared to fully remote or in-person formats, according to a new study by Simon Fraser University and Toronto Metropolitan researchers. The study, published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health , examined self-reported mental health scores from a survey of 1,576 Canadian workers aged 16 and older during the third wave of the pandemic.

Health - 13.10.2022
Flatworm-inspired medical adhesives stop blood loss
Flatworm-inspired medical adhesives stop blood loss
Drawing inspiration from nature, researchers from McGill University have developed a medical adhesive that could save lives Every year around 2 million people die worldwide from hemorrhaging or blood loss. Uncontrolled hemorrhaging accounts for more than 30% of trauma deaths. To stop the bleeding, doctors often apply pressure to the wound and seal the site with medical glue.

Economics / Business - 12.10.2022
Daily movie theatre ticket sales can predict stock market returns
Daily movie theatre ticket sales can predict stock market returns
Box office earnings create upward pressure on stock prices for at least five days Daily box office earnings can accurately predict stock market returns, according to a new study. Traditionally quarterly and monthly consumption data is used to predict stock market performance. But using box office earnings - a measure that captures consumption on a more frequent basis - offers more timely and relevant data for decision-makers in the financial markets.

Life Sciences - Environment - 12.10.2022
Atlantic salmon: catch and release may affect reproductive success
Atlantic salmon: catch and release may affect reproductive success
Under certain conditions, salmon caught and released have proportionally fewer offspring than salmon that were not caught by anglers Under certain conditions, catching and releasing a salmon would result in a decrease in the number of offspring it produces. This is what researchers from Laval University and their collaborators have shown in a study published in the journal Fisheries Management and Ecology .

Environment - Life Sciences - 11.10.2022
Climate change and deforestation may drive tree-dwelling primates to the ground
Climate change and deforestation may drive tree-dwelling primates to the ground
A large-scale study of 47 species of monkeys and lemurs has found that climate change and deforestation are driving these tree-dwelling animals to the ground, where they are at higher risk due to lack of preferred food and shelter and may experience more negative interaction with humans and domestic animals.

Computer Science - 06.10.2022
UBC students help NASA find landslides by training computers to read Reddit
UBC students help NASA find landslides by training computers to read Reddit
Science, Health & Technology Alex Walls UBC graduate students trained computers to "read" news articles about landslides on Reddit to bolster a NASA database, which could improve predictions of when and where these natural disasters will occur. For their Master of Data Science in Computational Linguistics capstone project, Badr Jaidi and his team, the Social Landslides group, trained computers to automatically extract useful information from relevant news articles about landslides that were posted to Reddit.