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Health - Social Sciences - 01.12.2022
Researchers analyze hair to study war trauma among Syrian refugee children   
Researchers analyze hair to study war trauma among Syrian refugee children   
There's more to a strand of hair than meets the eye. This human tissue is a chronological record-keeper of the adversities endured by the human body and mind. A new study co-authored by researchers at Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry's Drug Safety Lab analyzes the relationship between war exposure, current living conditions, hair cortisol concentrations (HCC) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms.

Social Sciences - 24.11.2022
Poverty and Instagram addiction
Poverty and Instagram addiction
Poverty linked to Facebook and Instagram addiction in teens Adolescents from lower-income backgrounds are more likely to report addictive use of social media, according to an international team of researchers including McGill University Professor Frank Elgar. The findings show a link between economic inequality and problematic use of social network platforms and instant messaging applications.

Health - Social Sciences - 23.11.2022
A new understanding of pain disparities among racial groups in U.S. 
A new understanding of pain disparities among racial groups in U.S. 
A new study co-authored by Western researcher Anna Zajacova shows that racial and ethnic disparities in pain prevalence in the U.S. are far larger than previously realized, with multiracial and Indigenous (Native American/Alaska Native) adults reporting the highest levels of pain. She says this finding is significant because pain can be used as a barometer of mental and physical health of a population.  "We aren't talking about one particular type of pain, we are looking at pain overall," said Zajacova, sociology professor at Western.

Health - Social Sciences - 15.11.2022
How should we navigate the next pandemic?
How should we navigate the next pandemic?
COVID-19 is the ninth pandemic, or large-scale epidemic, the world has experienced in the past century - and it won't be the last. To help the public and policymakers better navigate the next global outbreak, the University of Toronto has created the Institute for Pandemics (IFP) based at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health.

Health - Social Sciences - 17.10.2022
Some screen time better than none during children’s concussion recovery
Arts & Humanities Erik Rolfsen (Dr. Noah Silverberg) Too much screen time can slow children's recovery from concussions, but new research from UBC and the University of Calgary suggests that banning screen time is not the answer. The researchers looked for links between the self-reported screen time of more than 700 children aged 8-16 in the first 7-10 days following an injury, and symptoms reported by them and their caregivers over the following six months.

Social Sciences - 17.10.2022
University of Toronto researcher sheds new light on accusations against medieval poet Chaucer: New York Times
Long-held assumption about 14 -century English poet Geoffrey Chaucer are being challenged by new research co-led by the University of Toronto's Sebastian Sobecki and covered by The New York Times .

Health - Social Sciences - 04.10.2022
Researchers highlight the critical role of Ontario’s primary care providers during the pandemic
Primary care providers have a critical role to play in the pandemic - and improving access to that care is key, say researchers from the Ontario COVID-19 Science Advisory Table. The researchers released a three-part brief ( part 1 ,  part 2  and  part 3 ) this week detailing the work of primary care providers during the first two years of the pandemic.

Social Sciences - 30.09.2022
What do the slogans at demonstrations tell us?
What do the slogans at demonstrations tell us?
Sociologist and UdeM professor Cécile Van de Velde has analyzed text from seven major protests around the world to understand the voices of contemporary social movements. We see them on banners, hand-held signs, walls, clothing, bodies and faces: words are central to social protest. Every slogan-collective or individual, printed or handwritten, demand or rallying cry-conveys a political message and an expression of anger.

Social Sciences - History / Archeology - 26.09.2022
Bringing up baby, 10,000 years ago
Bringing up baby, 10,000 years ago
Further finds from an infant burial in Italy provides insights on the use of baby carriers and family heirlooms in prehistory, an UdeM-led study reveals. CONTENU - It seems logical enough: even in their earliest history, humans must have needed something to carry their babies around in as they moved from place to place.

Social Sciences - Health - 07.09.2022
Starting kindergarten: Normal stress for the vast majority of children
Starting kindergarten: Normal stress for the vast majority of children
Measures of morning salivary cortisol show that children experience stress when starting kindergarten. It's normal. The transition to kindergarten causes a generalized and normal increase in the stress hormone cortisol in children during the first two weeks of school. Cortisol levels then decrease in some children but not others.

Health - Social Sciences - 01.09.2022
Newborns of women with disabilities more likely to experience health complications
Newborns of women with disabilities more likely to experience health complications
Babies of women with disabilities have a greater chance of experiencing rare health complications and requiring intensive care - though many of the health issues are preventable, according to a new study. "There's good evidence that, especially for preterm birth and low-birth-weight babies, better access to prenatal care can make a big difference," says  Hilary Brown , co-author of the paper and assistant professor in the department of health and society at the University of Toronto Scarborough.

Psychology - Social Sciences - 24.08.2022
Using digital media to relax is related to lower-quality parenting
Using digital media to relax is related to lower-quality parenting
Negative parenting behaviours more likely when technology interrupts family interactions Caregivers who consume digital media for relaxation are more likely to engage in negative parenting practices, according to a new multinational study. The new study led by the University of Waterloo aimed to investigate the relationship between caregivers' use of digital media, mental health, and parenting practices at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Social Sciences - 24.08.2022
'people-centric' approach to surveys yields better data on diverse communities
’people-centric’ approach to surveys yields better data on diverse communities
A recent survey by University of Toronto Scarborough students not only gleaned important information from hundreds of households across Toronto, it provided critical insights on the act of surveying diverse communities that could help other researchers boost participation in future projects.

Environment - Social Sciences - 22.08.2022
Vulnerable communities face a higher risk of socio-economic injustice due to flood hazards
Vulnerable communities face a higher risk of socio-economic injustice due to flood hazards
Traditionally-recognized socially vulnerable groups in Canada bear a disproportionate burden of flood risks Socially vulnerable groups are at greater risk from climate-change-caused flooding because of systemic disadvantages, according to a new study. The study also reveals that neighbourhood-level racial or ethnic, economic, social, and demographic factors play a significant explanatory role in the distribution of flood risk across Canadian neighbourhoods.

Social Sciences - 18.08.2022
’Happy spouse, happy house?’ Study finds men and women equally strong predictors of relationship satisfaction
Researchers have found that men and women are both equally strong predictors of future relationship satisfaction in mixed-gender relationships - suggesting the phrase "Happy spouse, happy house" is not only a more inclusive maxim than the old saw about wives and lives, but far more accurate. "People experience ups and downs in their romantic relationships," says Emily Impett , a professor in the department of psychology at University of Toronto Mississauga.

Environment - Social Sciences - 18.08.2022
Greenland's Indigenous population favours extracting and exporting sand from melting ice sheet
Greenland’s Indigenous population favours extracting and exporting sand from melting ice sheet
An increasingly globalized Arctic Indigenous population wants to be involved in decision-making about adapting to accelerated Arctic changes A national survey of close to 1000 adults in Greenland (where approximately 90% of the population is Indigenous) conducted by a McGill University-led research team has found that a surprisingly large majority - 3 out of 4 Greenlanders - support extracting and exporting sand left by the melting ice sheet.

Social Sciences - Health - 16.08.2022
University of Toronto report shows food insecurity persists across Canada, varies by province
The latest national data from researchers at the University of Toronto show that food insecurity in Canada has remained largely unchanged over the last three years, with stark differences among the provinces. The report,  "Household Food Insecurity in Canada 2021 ," shows that 15.9 per cent of households across 10 provinces experienced some degree of food insecurity in the year before fall 2021, with little change since 2019.

Health - Social Sciences - 15.08.2022
Early sexual experiences could lead to healthier sex later in life: University of Toronto study
In her research,  Diana Peragine  encountered study after study that suggested an early sexual debut poses a risk to sexual health and sets the stage for a long list of negative outcomes, from unplanned pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections to sexual exploitation and abuse.

Social Sciences - 03.08.2022
Bioarchaeologists confirm museum shrunken head as human remains
Bioarchaeologists confirm museum shrunken head as human remains
Content Warning: This article contains digital visualizations of Ancestral human remains. While this work is part of an ongoing partnership with representatives of the associated Indigenous communities, they may be distressing to those of communities that have experienced trauma from past and ongoing colonialism.

Social Sciences - Health - 29.06.2022
Low-income Canadians are nearly four times more likely to die from opioids than the rich
Low-income Canadians are nearly four times more likely to die from opioids than the rich
A new study is the first to examine the connection between socioeconomic status and opioid incidents in Canada. The study reveals a connection between poverty and opioid-related hospitalization, emergency department visits and deaths in Canada. From 2000 to 2017, Canada's poorest residents were 3.8 times more likely to die of opioid-related causes than Canada's richest residents.