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Environment - 07.02.2023
Shedding light on how plants function
UdeM biologists come up with new statistical models to speed up the process of estimating leaf traits across many plants from a broad range of landscapes, making it easier to monitor changes in biodiv CONTENU - To understand how plants respond to and influence their environments, ecologists often use a series of standardized measurements called functional traits.

Materials Science - Physics - 07.02.2023
AI used to discover clean energy materials 'faster and more efficiently'
AI used to discover clean energy materials ’faster and more efficiently’
Researchers at the University of Toronto have developed a method of harnessing artificial intelligence to discover new and more efficient materials for clean energy technology. A team led by Alex Voznyy , an assistant professor in the department of physical and environmental sciences at University of Toronto Scarborough, used machine learning to significantly speed up the amount of time needed to find new materials with desired properties.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.02.2023
New research tool tackles deadly mosquito-borne diseases  
New research tool tackles deadly mosquito-borne diseases  
For most people living in Canada, mosquitoes are nothing more than a summertime nuisance, intruding on nights at the cottage and evenings around the campfire. But for millions of people around the world, particularly in the Global South, they are a serious and potentially fatal threat.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 06.02.2023
Sea urchins are on the move, and the 'Blob' is partly to blame
Sea urchins are on the move, and the ’Blob’ is partly to blame
New research has uncovered a change in behaviour of deep-sea fragile pink sea urchins off the south coast of Vancouver Island that is linked to climate change impacts including the " Blob ," a marine heatwave that persisted in the Pacific Ocean off North America between 2013 to 2016. Researchers from the Memorial University, Ocean Networks Canada (ONC) and the University of Victoria (UVic) found pink sea urchins  ( Strongylocentrotus fragilis ) have been moving up into shallower waters as food sources and oxygen levels at lower depths decline due to a warming ocean.

Life Sciences - 03.02.2023
A new understanding of reptile colouration
A new understanding of reptile colouration
Snakes and mice don't look alike. But much of what we know about skin colouration and patterning in vertebrates generally, including in snakes, is based on lab mice. However, there are limits to what mice can tell us about other vertebrates because they don't share all of the same types of colour-producing cells, known as chromatophores.

Environment - 02.02.2023
Small isolated wetlands are pollution-catching powerhouses
Small isolated wetlands are pollution-catching powerhouses
Study finds they outperform connected wetlands in filtering pollutants Small, isolated wetlands that are full for only part of the year are often the first to be removed for development or agriculture, but a new study shows that they can be twice as effective in protecting downstream lake or river ecosystems than if they were connected to them.

Life Sciences - Health - 02.02.2023
Researchers explore gene therapy model using zinc finger proteins
Researchers explore gene therapy model using zinc finger proteins
Researchers at the University of Toronto and New York University have developed a novel technology that can engineer proteins to target any stretch of DNA in the human genome, opening a door to gene therapies for a broader range of health conditions.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.02.2023
New EEG procedure accurately measures distress caused by tinnitus
New EEG procedure accurately measures distress caused by tinnitus
Researchers discover new way to understand and diagnose patients experiencing ringing in the ears. While it's especially common in older adults, tinnitus - a potentially devastating ringing in the ears - can affect people of all ages. Most often described as consistent buzzing, hissing or humming, tinnitus is usually caused by an underlying condition, like age-related hearing loss, an ear injury or heart disease and affects approximately one in five people in North America.

Physics - Chemistry - 01.02.2023
New discovery may be key to controlling chemical reactions
Unexpected resonance frequencies observed in reactions between two molecules A new study published today in Nature is changing our understanding of chemical reactions and overturning previous theoretical models by finding an unexpected resonance frequency during the reaction of two molecules. Resonance is when one object vibrating at the same natural frequency as a second object forces that second object into vibrational motion.

Campus - 01.02.2023
Picturing ruins: more than just a morbid fascination
Picturing ruins: more than just a morbid fascination
A graduate student's study of Instagram photographs of urban decline reveals humans have a deep-rooted attraction to decay. CONTENU - Click on hashtag #abandoned on Instagram and you'll find over 9 million posts. For hashtag #urbex, there are over 11 million. It's a seemingly endless supply of haunting photographs of ruins-abandoned houses in the middle of nowhere, crumbling industrial complexes overrun with weeds, ancient graveyards submerged under water.

Health - Life Sciences - 31.01.2023
Colorectal cancer surgery: gut microbiota helps healing
In a promising study, Canadian researchers have shown for the first time in mice that modifying intestinal flora before surgery could reduce postoperative complications in colorectal cancer patients. CONTENU - Published in the journal Gut, the study by scientists at the CHUM Research Centre (CRCHUM) in Montreal identified two bacterial strains that directly affect whether or not anastomotic leakage, more commonly known as intestinal leakage, occurs.

Health - 31.01.2023
Link between coffee and kidney disease may depend on genetic variant
Researchers at the University of Toronto and University of Padova have found that the association between heavy coffee consumption and kidney dysfunction hinges on a common genetic variation. In a study, the researchers showed that markers of kidney dysfunction were nearly three times higher in heavy coffee drinkers with a variant of the CYP1A2 gene that makes them slow metabolizers of caffeine than for other heavy coffee drinkers who had a different version of the gene that enables faster caffeine metabolism.

Physics - Architecture - 31.01.2023
'Liquid windows' inspired by squid skin could help buildings save energy
’Liquid windows’ inspired by squid skin could help buildings save energy
Inspired by the dynamic colour-changing skin of organisms such as squid, University of Toronto researchers have developed a multilayered fluidic system that can reduce the energy costs of heating, cooling and lighting buildings. The platform, which optimizes the wavelength, intensity and dispersion of light transmitted through windows, offers much greater control than existing technologies while keeping costs low due to its use of simple, off-the-shelf components.

Health - Life Sciences - 31.01.2023
Obesity-related neurodegeneration mimics Alzheimer's disease
Obesity-related neurodegeneration mimics Alzheimer’s disease
Thinning in the right temporo-parietal cortex and left prefrontal cortex were similar in both groups A new study led by scientists at The Neuro (Montreal Neurological Institute-Hospital) of McGill University finds a correlation between neurodegeneration in obese people and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients.

Mathematics - Health - 30.01.2023
New mathematical model shows how the body regulates potassium
Mathematical model conceptualizes the relationship between kidneys and muscles Having levels of potassium that are too high or too low can be fatal. A new mathematical model sheds light on the often mysterious ways the body regulates this important electrolyte. Potassium, a common mineral abundant in food like bananas and leafy greens, is essential to normal cellular function.

Astronomy / Space Science - Computer Science - 30.01.2023
University of Toronto undergrad develops AI technique to accelerate the search for extraterrestrial life
University of Toronto undergrad develops AI technique to accelerate the search for extraterrestrial life
Are we alone in the universe? With the help of artificial intelligence, scientists may be one step closer to finding the answer. Led by researchers at the University of Toronto, an international team of scientists has streamlined the search for extraterrestrial life by using a new algorithm to organize the data from their telescopes into categories to distinguish between real signals and interference.

Materials Science - Environment - 30.01.2023
Coating that prevents synthetic fabrics from shedding harmful microplastics in the wash
A team of researchers at the University of Toronto have designed a solution to reduce the amount of microplastic fibres shed when washing synthetic fabrics. In a world swamped by fast fashion - an industry that produces a high-volume of cheaply made clothing at an  immense cost to the environment  - more than two thirds of clothes are now made of synthetic fabrics, such as nylon, polyester, acrylic and rayon.

Health - 27.01.2023
Personal stories of health risks got students to stop vaping
Personal stories of health risks got students to stop vaping
Study shows how personal stories of health risks got students to stop vaping Results could be useful for curbing other harmful behaviours among youth, says researcher  By Megan Stacey , January 27, 2023 By Megan Stacey , January 27, 2023 A new Western study shows that university students who were regularly vaping wanted to cut back after learning about the threat the habit could pose to their health.

Life Sciences - 27.01.2023
Moths are the new tool to protect Canada’s wetlands
Waterloo biologists are leading the North American pilot program examining insect-based biocontrol of Phragmites. By Katharine Tuerke Faculty of Science University of Waterloo biologists, in partnership with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and the University of Toronto, are leading a North American pilot program that uses moths as a management tool to control an invasive plant threatening Canadian wetlands.

Health - Pharmacology - 25.01.2023
New 3D ultrasound may improve accuracy of liver cancer treatment
New 3D ultrasound may improve accuracy of liver cancer treatment
Simulated study finds new robotic ultrasound system can optimize liver cancer ablation therapy By Lawson Health Research Institute, Special to Western News, January 25, 2023 By Lawson Health Research Institute, Special to Western News, January 25, 2023 A simulated study by researchers at Western University and Lawson Health Research Institute has found a new system that uses ultrasound to construct 3D-images could make treatment of liver cancer, using thermal ablation, more accurate.
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