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Health - Physics - 15.09.2022
Researchers explore use of light-activated treatment to target wider variety of cancers
Researchers explore use of light-activated treatment to target wider variety of cancers
Chemotherapy drugs can be lifesaving - but they don't work for all patients or for all cancers. That's why a team of researchers at the University of Toronto Mississauga is looking at new ways to use special types of light to target cancer cells resistant to current drug therapy - an approach that might be easier on some patients than traditional chemotherapy.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.09.2022
Can feeling the beat improve your well-being?
A psychology researcher shows that a rhythmic video game can have beneficial effects on the motor skills of people living with Parkinson's disease. Could tapping on a cell phone to the beat of music improve the quality of life of people with Parkinson's disease? Simone Dalla Bella, a professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Montreal and co-director of the International Laboratory for Brain, Music and Sound Research (BRAMS), suspected it might.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.09.2022
Using voice as a biomarker for diagnosis
Doctors could soon have a new tool to detect disorders and illnesses such as pneumonia, Alzheimer's and autism, thanks to a Canada-U.S. database of human voices to which UdeM is contributing. Artificial intelligence may soon help doctors diagnose and treat diseases, including cancer and depression, based on the sound of a patient's voice, as 12 leading research institutions - including Université de Montréal - work to establish voice as a biomarker to be used in clinical care.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.09.2022
Muscle discovery, aging and memory, plus other stories
Muscle discovery may lead to better drugs The smallest constituents of muscles, myosin and actin, may be targeted to contribute to more effective treatment methods against heart and muscle diseases, say a group of international researchers at McGill University and Linnaeus University. The question of what happens at the molecular level inside our muscles when they are activated has long eluded researchers.

Social Sciences - Health - 07.09.2022
Starting kindergarten: Normal stress for the vast majority of children
Starting kindergarten: Normal stress for the vast majority of children
Measures of morning salivary cortisol show that children experience stress when starting kindergarten. It's normal. The transition to kindergarten causes a generalized and normal increase in the stress hormone cortisol in children during the first two weeks of school. Cortisol levels then decrease in some children but not others.

Health - Social Sciences - 01.09.2022
Newborns of women with disabilities more likely to experience health complications
Newborns of women with disabilities more likely to experience health complications
Babies of women with disabilities have a greater chance of experiencing rare health complications and requiring intensive care - though many of the health issues are preventable, according to a new study. "There's good evidence that, especially for preterm birth and low-birth-weight babies, better access to prenatal care can make a big difference," says  Hilary Brown , co-author of the paper and assistant professor in the department of health and society at the University of Toronto Scarborough.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.08.2022
What causes cell ’batteries’ to run down
Researchers at the University of Toronto have discovered how mitochondrial turnover - a critical cellular function - begins. Mitochondria are like the batteries of our bodies. They're vital sources of energy for cells and are necessary to regulate function in almost all cell types. And, like batteries, mitochondria need to be replaced as they run down over time. If these cell batteries aren't replaced efficiently, and don't turn over properly, cells experience stress and can die.

Health - Chemistry - 18.08.2022
Common ingredient in household products could be contributing to antibiotic resistance: University of Toronto researchers
Common ingredient in household products could be contributing to antibiotic resistance: University of Toronto researchers
A recent study by researchers at the University of Toronto has identified a chemical found in several consumer products that could be a potential cause of the rise of antibiotic resistance In Canada. The study, by Assistant Professor  Hui Peng 's research group in the department of chemistry in the Faculty of Arts & Science, was able to show that triclosan - a chemical often included in household items like hand soaps, toothpastes, and cleaning products to fight off bacteria - is the predominant antibiotic in Ontario sewage sludge.

Health - 18.08.2022
'weak spot' across major COVID-19 variants
’weak spot’ across major COVID-19 variants
Science, Health & Technology Brett Goldhawk Researchers at the University of British Columbia have discovered a key vulnerability across all major variants of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, including the recently emerged BA.1 and BA. Omicron subvariants. The weakness can be targeted by neutralizing antibodies, potentially paving the way for treatments that would be universally effective across variants.

Social Sciences - Health - 16.08.2022
University of Toronto report shows food insecurity persists across Canada, varies by province
The latest national data from researchers at the University of Toronto show that food insecurity in Canada has remained largely unchanged over the last three years, with stark differences among the provinces. The report,  "Household Food Insecurity in Canada 2021 ," shows that 15.9 per cent of households across 10 provinces experienced some degree of food insecurity in the year before fall 2021, with little change since 2019.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 16.08.2022
Researchers developing new methods for controlling deadly honeybee parasites
Researchers developing new methods for controlling deadly honeybee parasites
A new chemical compound under development at Simon Fraser University could give beekeepers an edge in the fight against varroa mites, a deadly parasite that affects honeybees. At her apiary in South Surrey, SFU Chemistry professor Erika Plettner is in the third year of field trials of a new treatment for managing these pests, which have become a serious problem for beekeepers around the world.

Health - 16.08.2022
COVID-19 vaccine and young children - expert answers for skeptical parents
Thanks to a recent decision by Health Canada, children in British Columbia over the age of six months are now eligible for COVID-19 vaccinations. And a recent study by UBC researchers reveals some surprising attitudes about child vaccination from parents who remain unvaccinated. Dr. Ran Goldman, professor of pediatrics at UBC, answers some questions for parents looking for more information before vaccinating their children.

Health - 15.08.2022
Measuring the social impact of disruptive weather, plus other stories
New research stories from McGill University. Using artificial intelligence to study the social impact of disruptive weather events Does a -disruptive weather event- imply extreme weather? Not necessarily, say two McGill researchers. Instead of focusing on social impacts, weather research tends to focus on meteorology.

Health - Social Sciences - 15.08.2022
Early sexual experiences could lead to healthier sex later in life: University of Toronto study
In her research,  Diana Peragine  encountered study after study that suggested an early sexual debut poses a risk to sexual health and sets the stage for a long list of negative outcomes, from unplanned pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections to sexual exploitation and abuse.

Health - 12.08.2022
Using sound and bubbles to make bandages stickier and longer lasting
Using sound and bubbles to make bandages stickier and longer lasting
Researchers have discovered that they can control the stickiness of adhesive bandages using ultrasound waves and bubbles. This breakthrough could lead to new advances in medical adhesives, especially in cases where adhesives are difficult to apply such as on wet skin. -Bandages, glues, and stickers are common bioadhesives that are used at home or in clinics.

Health - Chemistry - 10.08.2022
University of Toronto chemist aims to improve diagnosis of disease one protein molecule at a time
University of Toronto chemist aims to improve diagnosis of disease one protein molecule at a time
Scientists understand that proteins cause various diseases, from Alzheimer's to cystic fibrosis to Parkinson's to cataracts. But detecting them before they trigger illness is still a work in progress. For University of Toronto analytical chemist  Alana Ogata , the answer is to find better ways to identify single protein molecules in our bodily fluids, such as blood, urine, saliva and sweat.

Transport - Health - 09.08.2022
Study challenges attitudes about young people and pandemic preventative measures, plus other stories
Top marks: Quebec university students score high with COVID-19 compliance A new study led by McGill researchers found that compliance with public health measures was high among university level students in Quebec during a critical period of the pandemic in 2021. They found 78% per cent of students observed in the study followed the proper mask-wearing and two-metre physical distancing rules, close to the 80 per cent threshold suggested as necessary to reduce the spread of COVID-19.

Health - 04.08.2022
Passive exercise offers same brain health benefits as active movements: study 
Passive exercise offers same brain health benefits as active movements: study 
A new study by kinesiology graduate students from Western has found passive exercise leads to increased cerebral blood flow and improved executive function, providing the same cognitive benefits as active exercise. Published in Psychophysiology , the study is the first to look at whether there would be benefits to brain health during passive exercise where a person's limbs are moved via an external force - in this case, cycle pedals pushed by a mechanically driven flywheel.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.08.2022
Travel restrictions significantly reduced COVID-19 cases entering Canada - but insufficient to prevent new outbreaks
Travel restrictions significantly reduced COVID-19 cases entering Canada - but insufficient to prevent new outbreaks
Science, Health & Technology Brett Goldhawk Canada's restrictions on international travel drastically reduced the number of COVID-19 cases entering the country during the first waves of the pandemic but were insufficient to prevent new outbreaks, according to a new study led by University of British Columbia researchers.

Health - Computer Science - 02.08.2022
New diabetes monitor can detect glucose levels using breath
A next-generation diabetes monitor that analyses breath might soon mean no more needle pricks to check blood sugar levels. The device uses gas sensors to measure breath instantly, then links via Bluetooth with a program on a mobile device to give a readout. Distinct biomarkers in exhaled breath carry a subtle signature that the device picks up before the app uses a deep learning algorithm to produce rapid individual results.