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Life Sciences - Psychology - 01.12.2022
Researchers test promising tech treatment for youth depression
New research shows promising results using neurotechnological approaches to treat depression in youth. The research, led by Simon Fraser University (SFU) professor Faranak Farzan, is published in the Journal of Affective Disorders Reports. Researchers investigated the clinical and neurophysiological effects of using brain stimulation followed by cognitive exercise for treating Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) in 26 youth (aged 16 - 24 years old).

Environment - Life Sciences - 29.11.2022
An ecological rule breaker shows the effects of climate change on body size evolution
An ecological rule breaker shows the effects of climate change on body size evolution
Does evolution follow certain rules? Can these rules be predicted? Southeast Asia's tree shrews break multiple rules when it comes to body size variation - with an unexpected twist - according to researchers from McGill University, University of Cambridge, and Yale University. The findings shed new light on the effects of climate change on the evolution of body size in animals.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.11.2022
Tick-borne pathogens increasingly widespread in Central Canada
Tick-borne pathogens increasingly widespread in Central Canada
Tick-borne pathogens, known for causing illnesses such as Lyme disease, are on the rise in Central Canada - presenting new risks in areas where they were never previously detected. The findings from researchers at McGill University and the University of Ottawa demonstrate the need for more comprehensive testing and tracking to detect the spread and potential risk of tick-borne pathogens to human and wildlife populations throughout Canada.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.11.2022
Researchers identify SARS-CoV-2 variant in white-tailed deer, evidence of deer-to-human transmission
Researchers identify SARS-CoV-2 variant in white-tailed deer, evidence of deer-to-human transmission
In the summer of 2020, months after the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a global pandemic,  Samira Mubareka  and her colleagues began testing wildlife in Ontario and Quebec for the new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. "Pretty early in the pandemic, we knew that there was spillover from humans to animals," said Mubareka, who is a clinician scientist at Sunnybrook Research Institute and an associate professor in the department of laboratory medicine and pathobiology in the Temerty Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto.

Life Sciences - 08.11.2022
How female false widow spiders use their ’spidey senses’ to attract mates - study
When it comes to spider love, female widow spiders hold the key to attracting mates, potentially adjusting their web-s attractiveness to lure males, according to new research. A study led by Simon Fraser University's resident -spider man,- PhD candidate Andreas Fischer, reveals new details about how female false widow spiders ( Steatoda grossa) communicate using pheromones-and suggests they can build more attractive webs- to lure mate-seeking males by adjusting the pH level of their pheromone-bearing silk.

Life Sciences - 03.11.2022
The solar ballet of the white trillium
The solar ballet of the white trillium
The flowers of the white trillium follow the sun, which increases their fecundity, according to a research team in biological sciences at UdeM. Have you ever noticed, during your walks in the forest, that the flowers of the white trilliums all point in the same direction? In fact, the flowers are pointing south, towards the sun, and this is far from being a coincidence.

Life Sciences - 02.11.2022
An ultra-light photo collar to study lemmings
An ultra-light photo collar to study lemmings
Developed by a team at Laval University, this collar, which weighs less than a dime, will allow the study of lemming activity patterns during the summer Although lemmings play a central role in the Arctic terrestrial food chain, their living habits are still largely unknown. One reason is that these small rodents spend most of the year in tunnels in the ground or snow, out of sight of researchers.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.11.2022
DNA 'Nanotransporters' to treat cancer
DNA ’Nanotransporters’ to treat cancer
Canadian chemists specializing in nanotechnology draw inspiration from nature to create molecular transporters that optimize the release of therapeutic drugs.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.10.2022
Unlocking the mysteries of tauopathies: a protein that gives hope
A protein called 'numb' acts as a regulator of intracellular tau levels - and could someday be used to treat neurogenerative diseases, an UdeM-IRCM study finds. CONTENU - A mechanism has been found that controls cellular levels of tau, a protein whose abnormal accumulation is at the root of tauopathies, a class of devastating neurodegenerative diseases.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.10.2022
Researchers shrink brain tumours with gold nanoparticles, develop ’mini brains’ to study psychiatric disorders
Researchers at the University of Toronto are inching closer to realizing a life-saving brain cancer treatment by using gold nanoparticles to make radiation therapy more effective and less toxic for patients. In their battle against glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a rare, fast-growing cancer that begins in the brain, the multidisciplinary team has discovered that the nanoparticles can keep radiation tightly focused on the tumour, shrinking its size and preventing damage elsewhere in the body.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.10.2022
Researcher combines AI and microelectronics to create neural implants that fight brain disorders
Researcher combines AI and microelectronics to create neural implants that fight brain disorders
Neural implants can help treat brain disorders such as Parkinson's disease and epilepsy by directly modulating abnormal activities - and the University of Toronto's  Xilin Liu  is working with microelectronics and artificial intelligence to make this emerging technology both safer and smarter. "Neurons talk to each other in part via electrical signals, and a therapeutic neural implant produces electrical stimulation - like a pacemaker for the brain," says Liu, an assistant professor in the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering.

Life Sciences - Environment - 12.10.2022
Atlantic salmon: catch and release may affect reproductive success
Atlantic salmon: catch and release may affect reproductive success
Under certain conditions, salmon caught and released have proportionally fewer offspring than salmon that were not caught by anglers Under certain conditions, catching and releasing a salmon would result in a decrease in the number of offspring it produces. This is what researchers from Laval University and their collaborators have shown in a study published in the journal Fisheries Management and Ecology .

Environment - Life Sciences - 11.10.2022
Climate change and deforestation may drive tree-dwelling primates to the ground
Climate change and deforestation may drive tree-dwelling primates to the ground
A large-scale study of 47 species of monkeys and lemurs has found that climate change and deforestation are driving these tree-dwelling animals to the ground, where they are at higher risk due to lack of preferred food and shelter and may experience more negative interaction with humans and domestic animals.

Life Sciences - Research Management - 06.10.2022
A one-stop-shop for brain imaging
A one-stop-shop for brain imaging
Software tool brings together multiple brain maps in one place The brain is a complex organ, and no one imaging mode can catch everything that's going on inside it. Over the years, multiple -brain maps- have emerged, each focusing on different brain processes, from metabolism to cognitive function. While these maps are important, using them in isolation limits the discoveries researchers can make from them.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.10.2022
Consequences of cannabis exposure during pregnancy
Consequences of cannabis exposure during pregnancy
Team of researchers working to close knowledge gaps in the understanding of potential dangers of cannabis use during pregnancy A team of researchers from Western University is working to improve our understanding of how exposure to cannabis during pregnancy may impact the developing brain of the fetus.

Life Sciences - Physics - 03.10.2022
Breaking new ground on 'untapped', alternative brain imaging technique
Breaking new ground on ’untapped’, alternative brain imaging technique
A new research group is paving Western's way into a domain with potentially life-changing implications for our access to brain scanning technology. In 2006, Western neuroscientist Adrian Owen found landmark evidence for the consciousness of a patient in a vegetative state when a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scan revealed her brain activity after his team told her to imagine herself playing tennis.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 30.09.2022
The surprising Swiss-Army-knife-like functions of a powerful enzyme
The surprising Swiss-Army-knife-like functions of a powerful enzyme
Blue-green algae (AKA cyanobacteria) have a superpower which likely helps them be highly successful as invaders of waterways. They have an extraordinary ability to store energy and nitrogen in their cells for times of need. But how exactly they do so remains only partly understood. Now researchers from McGill University and their collaborators at ETH Zurich have uncovered an intriguing hitherto unknown ability of the enzymes (known as cyanophycin synthetases) that are active in creating these food reserves.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.09.2022
A new understanding of the neurobiology of impulsivity
A new understanding of the neurobiology of impulsivity
While not all impulsive behaviour speaks of mental illness, a wide range of mental health disorders which often emerge in adolescence, including depression and substance abuse, have been linked to impulsivity. So, finding a way to identify and treat those who may be particularly vulnerable to impulsivity early in life is especially important.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.09.2022
Quebec study on long COVID seeking participants
Purpose is to understand post-COVID symptom evolution and impact on patients- lives As of Sept. 20, 2022, there have been more than 1.1 million cases of COVID-19 in Quebec. It is estimated that 10 to 30 per cent of cases will have lingering symptoms after the acute illness. This means that as many as 330,000 Quebecers may experience what's become known as long COVID, or post-COVID-19 syndrome.

Life Sciences - 19.09.2022
How the brain develops: a new way to shed light on cognition
Researchers at Mila and IVADO introduce a new neurocomputational model of the human brain that could bridge the gap in understanding AI and the biological mechanisms underlying mental disorders. CONTENU - A new study introduces a new neurocomputational model of the human brain that could shed light on how the brain develops complex cognitive abilities and advance neural artificial intelligence research.
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