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Life Sciences - Mechanical Engineering - 08.08.2022
Tip for riders of hoverboards
Tip for riders of hoverboards
Engineering researchers have some simple advice for people learning to ride hoverboards: it's all in the ankles. An experiment using sophisticated cameras and sensors attached to first-time riders revealed that ankle movements, not knee or hip movements, are the key to catching on to the increasingly popular devices.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.08.2022
Travel restrictions significantly reduced COVID-19 cases entering Canada - but insufficient to prevent new outbreaks
Travel restrictions significantly reduced COVID-19 cases entering Canada - but insufficient to prevent new outbreaks
Science, Health & Technology Brett Goldhawk Canada's restrictions on international travel drastically reduced the number of COVID-19 cases entering the country during the first waves of the pandemic but were insufficient to prevent new outbreaks, according to a new study led by University of British Columbia researchers.

Life Sciences - 02.08.2022
Researchers crack 30-year-old mystery of odour switching in worms
Researchers crack 30-year-old mystery of odour switching in worms
Soil-dwelling nematodes depend on their sophisticated sense of smell for survival, able to distinguish between more than a thousand different scents - but the molecular mechanism behind their olfaction has baffled scientists for decades. Now, researchers at the University of Toronto's Terrence Donnelly Centre for Cellular & Biomolecular Research appear to have solved the long-standing mystery - and the implications of their findings stretch beyond nematode olfaction, perhaps offering insights into how the human brain functions.

Life Sciences - 01.08.2022
Why are some birds more intelligent than others?
Why are some birds more intelligent than others?
If you-ve ever seen a starling peck open a garbage bag or a grackle steal your dog pellets, you get a sense that some birds have learned to take advantage of new feeding opportunities - a clear sign of their intelligence. Scientists have long wondered why certain species of birds are more innovative than others, and whether these capacities stem from larger brains (which intuitively seems likely) or from a greater number of neurons in specific areas of the brain.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.07.2022
New hydrogel for more targeted cancer treatments
New hydrogel for more targeted cancer treatments
University of Toronto researchers have designed a new way to grow cells in a lab that enables them to better emulate cancerous tumours. The platform - based on a type of material known as a hydrogel, a soft jelly-like substance - opens new ways to advance treatment options for cancer.

Life Sciences - Environment - 28.07.2022
Whales' eyes offer glimpse into their evolution from land to sea
Whales’ eyes offer glimpse into their evolution from land to sea
University of Toronto researchers have shed light on the evolutionary transition of whales' early ancestors from on-shore living to deep-sea foraging, suggesting that these ancestors had visual systems that could quickly adapt to the dark. Their findings show that the common ancestor of living whales was already a deep diver, able to see in the blue twilight zone of the ocean, with eyes that swiftly adjusted to dim conditions as the whale rushed down on a deep breath of surface air.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.07.2022
Histamine-producing gut bacteria can trigger chronic abdominal pain
Hamilton, ON (July 27, 2022) - Researchers from McMaster University and Queen's University have discovered a gut bacterial 'super-producer' of histamine that can cause pain flare-ups in some patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The culprit is what has now been named Klebsiella aerogenes, the McMaster-Queen's (MQ) strain, identified in up to 25 per cent of gut microbiota samples from patients with IBS.

Environment - Life Sciences - 25.07.2022
Measuring the environmental impact of a hydroelectric dam at Inukjuak
Measuring the environmental impact of a hydroelectric dam at Inukjuak
A research team led by Marc Amyot is assessing the environmental impact of building a dam on permafrost at Inukjuak, in collaboration with the Inuit community. The Innavik Hydro Project currently being built by the Pituvik Landholding Corporation in partnership with Hydro-Québec, Innergex Renewable Energy Inc.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.07.2022
New study explores infection effect on fetal brain development
New study explores infection effect on fetal brain development
Western researchers are investigating what happens to a baby's developing brain when an infection occurs during pregnancy. (Unsplash) The risk of infection during pregnancy has always been a concern, but the high rate of illness during the COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the potential impact of infection on a developing brain.

Life Sciences - Environment - 21.07.2022
The tiny bodies of bats allow perfect balance between flight costs and heat dissipation
The tiny bodies of bats allow perfect balance between flight costs and heat dissipation
Many mammal species living in cold climates tend to have large bodies and short limbs to reduce heat loss - a general pattern known as Bergmann's rule. However, bats are the exception to the rule, displaying small body sizes in both hot and cold regions. A McGill-led team of researchers is shedding light on this long-standing debate over bats- body sizes and focus on why bats are seemingly non-conforming to ecogeographical patterns found in other mammals.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 20.07.2022
No pain, no gain? How the brain chooses between pain and profit
No pain, no gain? How the brain chooses between pain and profit
Imagine having to choose over and over between what you enjoy doing and the pain that it might cause you, whether physical or emotional. If you live with conditions such as depression, anxiety, or chronic pain, you are probably familiar with making these difficult choices on a daily or weekly basis. But surprisingly little is known about which areas of the brain are involved in decisions of this kind.

Life Sciences - 19.07.2022
Hibernating insects regrow muscles on demand: study
Hibernating insects regrow muscles on demand: study
Even as gas prices soar, most people don't destroy their car's engine just to save energy - and that's one luxury certain insects have that those humans don't. New research from Western University has found potato beetles can break down and regrow muscles on demand, allowing them to preserve energy over the winter.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 13.07.2022
Fighting climate change with deep-sea water
Microbes deep down in the ocean could be a good tool to transform carbon into more stable molecules, a laboratory study at UdeM suggests. Marine biologists have long known the power of microbes to transform carbon released by surface phytoplankton - algae on the surface of the sea - into more stable molecules.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.07.2022
New chemical biological tools to monitor Parkinson's disease
New chemical biological tools to monitor Parkinson’s disease
Researchers are a step closer to understanding how Parkinson's disease develops and progresses thanks to chemical biological tools developed at Simon Fraser University. New research, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA, and spearheaded by SFU researchers Matthew Deen and Yanping Zhu, outlines new technology and methods to measure the activity of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase (GCase), an enzyme that is commonly linked to Parkinson's disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.07.2022
Towards a cure for lymphoma: new research brings hope
UdeM medical professor Tarik Möröy and his team have identified a therapeutic target for the treatment of lymphoma. New light is being shed on the mechanisms underlying the malignant transformation of lymphomas, paving the way for a promising therapeutic target, thanks to research conducted by a team led by Université de Montréal professor Tarik Möröy.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.06.2022
Cancer drug shows potential as treatment for muscular dystrophy
Cancer drug shows potential as treatment for muscular dystrophy
Science, Health & Technology Brett Goldhawk Researchers at UBC's School of Biomedical Engineering have discovered that an existing cancer drug could have potential as a treatment for muscular dystrophy. The researchers found that the drug - known as a colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) inhibitor - helped slow the progress of Duchenne muscular dystrophy in mice by increasing the resiliency of muscle fibres.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.06.2022
Combining genetics and brain MRI can aid in predicting chances of Alzheimer’s disease
Simon Fraser researchers are studying how a combination of genetics and brain MRIs may be used to predict the chances of developing Alzheimer's disease in the future. In a newly published study, researchers from SFU-s Functional and Anatomical Imaging & Shape Analysis Lab (FAISAL) identified distinct properties of brain MRIs and genetics that impact the prediction of Dementia of Alzheimer's Type, or DAT, for patients at various stages of the disease, then developed a biomarker that can help predict future conversion to DAT.

Life Sciences - 27.06.2022
Southern resident killer whales not getting enough to eat since 2018
Southern resident killer whales not getting enough to eat since 2018
The endangered southern resident killer whale population isn't getting enough to eat, and hasn't been since 2018, a new UBC study has determined. The animals have been in an energy deficit, averaged across spring, summer and fall, for six of the last 40 years-meaning the energy they get from food is less than what they expend.

Life Sciences - 27.06.2022
Pre-natal exposure to alcohol: fathers may be partly responsible
Pre-natal exposure to alcohol: fathers may be partly responsible
In male mice, alcohol consumption in the weeks preceding conception affects the transcription of genes important for fetal development Preventing fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) has traditionally been seen as a maternal responsibility, but a growing body of research suggests that fathers have a responsibility as well.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 23.06.2022
Mosquito-repellent paint? Researchers say slippery walls make it difficult for the biting insects to rest
Mosquito-repellent paint? Researchers say slippery walls make it difficult for the biting insects to rest
As the planet warms, outbreaks of mosquito-borne diseases are becoming more common around the world. Traditional solutions include bed nets or chemical treatment - but researchers at the University of Toronto's Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering are trying a new angle: mosquito-repellent paint.
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