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Materials Science - Health - 17.01.2022
Why are zebra mussels so sticky? Study could lead to new industrial coatings, medical adhesives
Why are zebra mussels so sticky? Study could lead to new industrial coatings, medical adhesives
A water tank full of coin-sized invertebrates may not be the first thing you'd expect to see in a materials science and engineering research lab. But Eli Sone , a professor in the department of materials science and engineering in the University of Toronto's Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering and the Institute of Biomedical Engineering, and his team have been studying both zebra and quagga mussels for years in the hope that they can help solve a diverse range of challenges.

Physics - Materials Science - 23.11.2021
Graphene-like 2D material leverages quantum effects to achieve ultra-low friction
Graphene-like 2D material leverages quantum effects to achieve ultra-low friction
Researchers from the University of Toronto's Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering and Rice University have reported the first measurements of the ultra-low-friction behaviour of a material known as magnetene. The results point the way toward strategies for designing similar low-friction materials for use in a variety of fields, including tiny, implantable devices.

Materials Science - Campus - 25.10.2021
Nature-inspired coatings could power lab-on-a-chip devices for rapid, inexpensive medical tests
Nature-inspired coatings could power lab-on-a-chip devices for rapid, inexpensive medical tests
A coating developed by researchers at the University of Toronto allows for certain liquids to move across surfaces without fluid loss - and could usher in new advances in a range of fields, including medical testing. The new coating - created in the  DREAM (Durable Repellent Engineered Advanced Materials) laboratory, led by  Kevin Golovin , an assistant professor of mechanical engineering in the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering - was inspired by the natural world.

Materials Science - Innovation - 28.09.2021
Unbreakable glass inspired by seashells
Unbreakable glass inspired by seashells
Scientists from McGill University develop stronger and tougher glass, inspired by the inner layer of mollusk shells. Instead of shattering upon impact, the new material has the resiliency of plastic and could be used to improve cell phone screens in the future, among other applications. While techniques like tempering and laminating can help reinforce glass, they are costly and no longer work once the surface is damaged.