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History / Archeology - 05.04.2024
Make yourself at home... 40,000 years ago
Make yourself at home... 40,000 years ago
An UdeM study unveils fresh insights into how Neanderthals and Homo sapiens organized their living spaces at the Riparo Bombrini site in northern Italy. How did our Paleolithic ancestors go about organizing their living spaces? In a study published in the Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory, archeologists from Université de Montréal and the University of Genoa reveal that far from being more primitive, Neanderthals did much the same as their Homo sapiens successors: made themselves at home.

History / Archeology - Architecture - 22.01.2024
What can today’s architects learn from a lost ventilation system used in 19th century building design?
By revamping a forgotten heat recovery technique used in the design of Montreal's Royal Victoria Hospital, McGill researchers say modern temperature control and ventilation design could be transformed As the COVID-19 pandemic raises questions about efficient ventilation and the climate crisis threatens to exacerbate extreme temperatures, efficient building design is front of mind for today's architects.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 07.12.2023
Researchers reconstruct Balkan genomic history
Researchers reconstruct Balkan genomic history
A new multidisciplinary study reconstructs the genomic history of the Balkan Peninsula during the first millennium of the common era, a time and place of profound demographic, cultural and linguistic change. The Balkan Peninsula is broadly defined as the region surrounded by the Adriatic, Aegean and Black Seas.

History / Archeology - Agronomy / Food Science - 19.06.2023
The old grind just got a little older
The old grind just got a little older
An Italian study involving UdeM researchers shows new evidence that humans and Neanderthals milled flour as long as 43,000 years ago, several thousand years before what was previously thought, making Long before the invention of agriculture, humans already knew how to process cereals and other wild plants into a flour suitable for food - and now there's new evidence they did so long before scientists was previously thought.

Environment - History / Archeology - 25.01.2023
8 billion and counting: will the Earth survive?
The good news is that global population growth has slowed and won't in itself cause climate change, says UdeM demographics professor Alain Gagnon. CONTENU - Credit: Photo de courtoisie In November, the United Nations announced that the Earth is now home to eight billion people, or seven billion more than there were just 200 years ago.

History / Archeology - 20.12.2022
Looking for a faster way to learn a language? Try historical linguistics
In recent years, language-learning apps, websites, and podcasts have exploded in popularity, promising fun and faster ways to make us fluent. But a new study conducted by UBC English James Stratton finds that one of the best ways of fast-tracking your language acquisition may be to learn a bit of language history - at least when it comes to learning a historically related language.

Social Sciences - History / Archeology - 26.09.2022
Bringing up baby, 10,000 years ago
Bringing up baby, 10,000 years ago
Further finds from an infant burial in Italy provides insights on the use of baby carriers and family heirlooms in prehistory, an UdeM-led study reveals. CONTENU - It seems logical enough: even in their earliest history, humans must have needed something to carry their babies around in as they moved from place to place.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 14.06.2022
AI-powered archaeology draws out hidden evidence of fire use by early humans
AI-powered archaeology draws out hidden evidence of fire use by early humans
Researchers from the University of Toronto, the Weizmann Institute of Science and Hebrew University have identified new evidence of the use of fire by ancient humans at least 800,000 years ago at a site in western Israel. The discovery, described in a study published this week in  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , suggests only the sixth location worldwide of evidence of fire more than half a million years old.

History / Archeology - 11.02.2022
Identifying the portable toilets of the ancient Roman world
Identifying the portable toilets of the ancient Roman world
Arts & Humanities Erik Rolfsen New research published today in the Journal of Archaeological Science Reports reveals how archaeologists can determine when a pot was used by Romans as a portable toilet, known as a chamber pot. "Conical pots of this type have been recognized quite widely in the Roman Empire and in the absence of other evidence they have often been called storage jars.

History / Archeology - Social Sciences - 14.12.2021
Equal at birth and in death
Equal at birth and in death
When baby 'Neve' died 10,000 years ago, she was accorded a proper burial recognizing her as a full person, archeologists on a dig in Italy find. The baby girl was born roughly 10,000 years ago, after the end of the last Ice Age in what is now Liguria, northwestern Italy, but didn't survive more than two months.

Criminology / Forensics - History / Archeology - 06.10.2021
New approach to skeletal age-estimation can help identify juvenile remains
New approach to skeletal age-estimation can help identify juvenile remains
New research by SFU archaeologists could help forensic teams in their work to estimate the age of the remains of children discovered during archaeological work or in criminal investigative cases. Their study is published in the journal Forensic Science International . While age is typically determined by dental records or other methods, such as measuring the long bones in the upper or lower limbs, those methods may not always be possible, especially in the case of young children.