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Results 1 - 11 of 11.


Materials Science - Environment - 30.01.2023
Coating that prevents synthetic fabrics from shedding harmful microplastics in the wash
A team of researchers at the University of Toronto have designed a solution to reduce the amount of microplastic fibres shed when washing synthetic fabrics. In a world swamped by fast fashion - an industry that produces a high-volume of cheaply made clothing at an  immense cost to the environment  - more than two thirds of clothes are now made of synthetic fabrics, such as nylon, polyester, acrylic and rayon.

Materials Science - 24.10.2022
Penguin feathers may hold an effective anti-icing solution
Penguin feathers may hold an effective anti-icing solution
McGill University research team develops chemical-free solution that could be used to de-ice electrical wires, wind turbines and even airplane wings In 1998, ice build-up on electrical towers and wires caused the ice storm that paralyzed eastern Canada and the northeastern United States, leaving many people in the dark and cold for days and even weeks.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 14.06.2022
A biological super glue from mistletoe berries?
A biological super glue from mistletoe berries?
Each mistletoe berry can produce up to two metres of a gluey thread called viscin. It allows the seeds of this parasitic plant to stick to and infect host plants. Since ancient times, mistletoe berries have been explored as treatments for everything from infertility and epilepsy to cancer. But, until now, no one has fully investigated the potential medical or technical uses of the glue itself.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 09.06.2022
Researchers envision wood-derived, self-powered biosensors for wireless devices
Researchers envision wood-derived, self-powered biosensors for wireless devices
Wood-derived materials can be used to harvest electrical energy from everyday movements such as walking, according to University of Toronto and University of Waterloo researchers. In a new study recently published in Nano Energy , the team demonstrated the use of lignocellulosic nanofibrils - derived from tree bark - in a prototype self-powered device capable of sending a wireless signal to a smartphone via bluetooth.

Physics - Materials Science - 09.05.2022
Unusual quantum state of matter observed for the first time at UdeM
Physicist Andrea Bianchi has observed the "quantum spin liquid" state in a magnetic material created in his lab. It's not every day that someone comes across a new state of matter in quantum physics, the scientific field devoted to describing the behaviour of atomic and subatomic particles in order to elucidate their properties.

Materials Science - 11.04.2022
Are more protective masks less comfortable? Not as long as they fit properly
Wearing a face mask, when combined with other protective measures, has been shown to help slow the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19. But there remain many misconceptions about the relationship between a mask's level of protection and its comfort - namely that more protective models such as N95 respirators are less comfortable to wear.

Health - Materials Science - 10.02.2022
Futuristic coating for hospital fabrics and activewear kills COVID and E. coli
Futuristic coating for hospital fabrics and activewear kills COVID and E. coli
UBC researchers have developed an inexpensive, non-toxic coating for almost any fabric that decreases the infectivity of the virus that causes COVID-19 by up to 90 per cent. And in the future, you might be able to spray it on fabric yourself. "When you're walking into a hospital, you want to know that pillow you're putting your head onto is clean," says lead author Taylor Wright, a doctoral candidate in the department of chemistry.

Materials Science - Health - 17.01.2022
Why are zebra mussels so sticky? Study could lead to new industrial coatings, medical adhesives
Why are zebra mussels so sticky? Study could lead to new industrial coatings, medical adhesives
A water tank full of coin-sized invertebrates may not be the first thing you'd expect to see in a materials science and engineering research lab. But Eli Sone , a professor in the department of materials science and engineering in the University of Toronto's Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering and the Institute of Biomedical Engineering, and his team have been studying both zebra and quagga mussels for years in the hope that they can help solve a diverse range of challenges.

Physics - Materials Science - 23.11.2021
Graphene-like 2D material leverages quantum effects to achieve ultra-low friction
Graphene-like 2D material leverages quantum effects to achieve ultra-low friction
Researchers from the University of Toronto's Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering and Rice University have reported the first measurements of the ultra-low-friction behaviour of a material known as magnetene. The results point the way toward strategies for designing similar low-friction materials for use in a variety of fields, including tiny, implantable devices.

Materials Science - Campus - 25.10.2021
Nature-inspired coatings could power lab-on-a-chip devices for rapid, inexpensive medical tests
Nature-inspired coatings could power lab-on-a-chip devices for rapid, inexpensive medical tests
A coating developed by researchers at the University of Toronto allows for certain liquids to move across surfaces without fluid loss - and could usher in new advances in a range of fields, including medical testing. The new coating - created in the  DREAM (Durable Repellent Engineered Advanced Materials) laboratory, led by  Kevin Golovin , an assistant professor of mechanical engineering in the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering - was inspired by the natural world.

Materials Science - Innovation - 28.09.2021
Unbreakable glass inspired by seashells
Unbreakable glass inspired by seashells
Scientists from McGill University develop stronger and tougher glass, inspired by the inner layer of mollusk shells. Instead of shattering upon impact, the new material has the resiliency of plastic and could be used to improve cell phone screens in the future, among other applications. While techniques like tempering and laminating can help reinforce glass, they are costly and no longer work once the surface is damaged.