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Life Sciences - Chemistry - 08.06.2022
Researchers to study whether metal-corroding microbes can grow in Canada’s proposed nuclear waste facility
With Canada getting closer to moving all its spent nuclear fuel to a single facility, and encasing each fuel container in bentonite clay, researchers are studying whether that clay could support microbial life - which†could eat away at†the metal containers.

Life Sciences - 06.06.2022
Scientists urge WTO to ban subsidies that promote overfishing
Scientists urge WTO to ban subsidies that promote overfishing
Q&As Alex Walls Scientists are calling on the World Trade Organization (WTO) to ban subsidies that can cause overfishing at its meeting next week.

Environment - Life Sciences - 06.06.2022
UBC experts on World Oceans Day
UBC experts on World Oceans Day
UBC experts are available to comment on various topics on June 8, World Oceans Day.

Health - Life Sciences - 03.06.2022
The unsuspected virtues of hot pepper
The unsuspected virtues of hot pepper
Hot pepper is hot. But it's also packed with potential therapeutic qualities. Capsaicin is the molecule that has it all! UdeM experts explain. It adds punch, heat, personality. It injects flavour, colour, aroma. It goes by many names-habanero, cayenne, jalapeŮo, poblano, bird's eye-but hot pepper by any name always gets a reaction.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.06.2022
University of Toronto researchers awarded 20 new and renewed Canada Research Chairs
University of Toronto researchers awarded 20 new and renewed Canada Research Chairs
From neuroimaging of aging to Indigenous methodologies with youth and communities, the University of Toronto's 20 new and renewed Canada Research Chairs are working to address key global challenges and advance knowledge across a wide range of fields.

Materials Science - Life Sciences - 18.05.2022

Health - Life Sciences - 12.05.2022
B.C. researchers launching clinical trial for first genetically engineered stem cell-based therapy for type 1 diabetes
B.C. researchers launching clinical trial for first genetically engineered stem cell-based therapy for type 1 diabetes
Science, Health & Technology Vivian Sum Researchers from the University of British Columbia and Vancouver Coastal Health (VCH) have received $1 million from Canada's Stem Cell Network to conduct research and a clinical trial for one of the world's first genetically engineered cell replacement therapies for type 1 diabetes.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.05.2022
New Gray chair aims to solve pain-limiting mobility problems †
Siobhan Schabrun, a researcher who studies chronic pain, is the Gray Chair in Mobility and Activity (Debora Van Brenk, Western Communications) Few people enjoy talking about, or even thinking about, chronic pain.

Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 10.05.2022

Campus - Life Sciences - 25.04.2022
Hocus focus: Undergrads study stage magic to learn about the mind, gaps in perception
Good magicians never reveal their tricks, but Dirk Bernhardt-Walther does.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.04.2022
Inaugural neuroscience fellows ’looking to make a difference’
(L-R) Uma Venkatasubramanian, Roberto Budzinski and Kathleen Lyons are three inaugural research fellows of the Western Institute of Neuroscience.

Environment - Life Sciences - 21.04.2022

Psychology - Life Sciences - 20.04.2022
Feeling sensations - including ones connected to sadness - are key to depression recovery: University of Toronto study
The physical sensations that accompany sadness can feel as undesirable as they are intense - a constriction of the chest, watery eyes and a raw throat, to name a few.

Environment - Life Sciences - 19.04.2022
UBC experts on Earth Day 2022
UBC experts on Earth Day 2022
Environmental law, climate justice and organizing Dr. Kathryn Harrison Professor, Department of Political Science Email:† kathryn.harrison@ubc.ca Environmental politics and polic

Health - Life Sciences - 07.04.2022
University of Toronto partners with Moderna to advance research in RNA science and technology
University of Toronto partners with Moderna to advance research in RNA science and technology
The University of Toronto and Moderna, Inc. known for its mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccine - plan to work together to develop new tools to prevent and treat infectious diseases.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 04.04.2022
Promising new treatment for ALS goes to clinical trials
Promising new treatment for ALS goes to clinical trials
After 12 years of research, Dr. Richard Robitaille is hopeful that we'll soon have a treatment to help people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) regain mobility.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.04.2022
Western researcher turns to big data in hunt for HIV cure†
Scanning electromicrograph of an HIV-infected T cell. (U.S.National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Wikimedia Commons) Roux-Cil Ferreira's quest can best be described as searching for a needle in a field full of haystacks.

Health - Life Sciences - 31.03.2022

Psychology - Life Sciences - 31.03.2022
Neuroscience experts unlock mystery of autism-related anxiety†
It is also inspired by something a whole lot less tangible but equally important. "This research gives families hope," said Duerden, a professor in Western's Faculty of Education and head of the Developing Brain Lab , built to study cognitive development in infants and children through behavioural assessments and brain imaging.

Health - Life Sciences - 31.03.2022
Changing lives at home and abroad†
As a young neurology resident, Dr. Jorge Burneo was drawn to epilepsy research by two factors: its potential to improve patients' lives and to take back valuable knowledge to his native Peru, where epilepsy rates are three times higher than in Canada.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.03.2022
With the flip of a switch, UV-LED lights could be used to kill coronaviruses and other germs: University of Toronto study
With the flip of a switch, UV-LED lights could be used to kill coronaviruses and other germs: University of Toronto study
Lighting used in offices and public spaces could potentially be used to destroy coronaviruses and HIV.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.03.2022

Life Sciences - Health - 16.03.2022
Neuroscientist partners with†law firm for concussion research†
Image of some damaged neural networks in a concussed brain. Image courtesy of Andrea Soddu, Western University A bruised leg is relatively easy to diagnose and treat, and has a predictable recovery time; a wounded brain, much less so. Now, a Western physicist-turned-neuroscientist has developed unique brain-imaging software that is helping a London, Ont., law firm strengthen the case for better support for clients with concussions.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.03.2022
Pioneering research bridges engineering and medicine
Dr. Victor Yang dreams of building better surgical devices. Now, his journey to do just that will take place at Schulich Medicine & Dentistry , as the innovative neuroscientist and biomedical engineer joins the faculty in the department of clinical neurological sciences.

Life Sciences - Environment - 04.03.2022
Academic-industry partnership develops better way to manage sulfur compounds at mining sites
Academic-industry partnership develops better way to manage sulfur compounds at mining sites
A mine straddling the border of Saskatchewan and northern Manitoba will be the first†in the world to deploy an innovative new technique for monitoring and managing sulfur compounds, including thiosalts.

Environment - Life Sciences - 02.03.2022
Grunts, squeals and boops-FishSounds launches online library of fish noise
Grunts, squeals and boops-FishSounds launches online library of fish noise
Fascinating soundscapes exist beneath rivers, lakes and oceans. An unexpected sound source are fish making their own unique and entertaining noise from guttural grunts to high-pitched squeals.

Health - Life Sciences - 23.02.2022
Western researchers get $1.25M in federal funding
Western's ground-breaking project to develop a suite of molecular profiles for complex, chronic diseases, which can potentially lead to innovative treatments, has received more than half a million do

Life Sciences - Health - 22.02.2022

Health - Life Sciences - 17.02.2022
Expert Insight: How new COVID-19 variants evolve and emerge
Nature is analogue. It is not a binary system. In the living world there are no explicit switches that discreetly turn systems on or off.

Life Sciences - 10.02.2022
New findings on basking sharks blow assumptions out of the water†
Basking shark, Cetorhinus maximus, the 2nd largest fish in the sea, feeding by straining plankton through gill rakers, off Land's End, Cornwall, United Kingdom.

Life Sciences - Campus - 27.01.2022
Researchers shed light on how fetal alcohol exposure increases risk of development disorders
Researchers at the University†of Toronto's Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy have uncovered mechanisms that help to explain how the breast cancer 1 susceptibility protein (BRCA1), best known for its rol

Environment - Life Sciences - 27.01.2022
Data from thousands of cameras confirms protected areas promote mammal diversity
Data from thousands of cameras confirms protected areas promote mammal diversity
Science, Health & Technology Lou Corpuz-Bosshart A new University of British Columbia study offers new evidence that protected areas are effective at conserving wildlife. Researchers at UBC's faculty of forestry analyzed data from a global data set drawing from 8,671 camera trap stations spanning four continents.

Life Sciences - Health - 26.01.2022
To beat depression, researchers hunt for perfect brain stimulation therapy 'rhythm'
To beat depression, researchers hunt for perfect brain stimulation therapy ’rhythm’
When it comes to finding a long-lasting treatment for depression, a team of Toronto researchers†says it could come down to finding the perfect rhythm.

Astronomy / Space Science - Life Sciences - 21.01.2022

Life Sciences - 18.01.2022

Psychology - Life Sciences - 13.01.2022
Symptoms and traits of borderline personality disorder may run in families: University of Toronto research
Family members of those with borderline personality disorder (BPD) show similarities in their brains and personalities≠ - and†even interpret some facial expressions similarly, according to a series of studies by researchers at the University of Toronto. "One of the more urgent questions I hear when I speak with family groups is whether the disorder can be passed down from parents to their children," says† Anthony C. Ruocco , professor, interim graduate chair and director of clinical training in University of Toronto Scarborough's department of psychological clinical science.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.01.2022
Researchers lead $24 million project to treat spinal cord injury
Science, Health & Technology Lou Corpuz-Bosshart Federally funded work will develop a biomaterial bridge to help regrow nerve fibres A key challenge in treating traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI)-the