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Environment - Life Sciences - 29.11.2022
An ecological rule breaker shows the effects of climate change on body size evolution
An ecological rule breaker shows the effects of climate change on body size evolution
Does evolution follow certain rules? Can these rules be predicted? Southeast Asia's tree shrews break multiple rules when it comes to body size variation - with an unexpected twist - according to researchers from McGill University, University of Cambridge, and Yale University. The findings shed new light on the effects of climate change on the evolution of body size in animals.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 17.11.2022
Millions at risk as drylands degrade, finds study
Millions at risk as drylands degrade, finds study
Drylands are experiencing increasingly levels of degradation and desertification, changes that could put already vulnerable populations at greater risk. A research team, including Natasha MacBean , conducted an examination of dryland productivity and its important role in global carbon and water cycling, to understand the impact of climate change and human activity on future dryland ecosystem functioning.

Environment - 14.11.2022
New tool developed to monitor health of marine ecosystems and extinction risk of species
Scientists from Simon Fraser University are part of an international team of researchers that has developed a new science-based indicator to assess the state of health of the oceans-and the possible risk of extinction of their species. Recent biodiversity studies show an unprecedented loss of species, ecosystems and genetic diversity on land, but the extent to which these patterns are widespread in the oceans is not yet known.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 10.11.2022
A river runs beneath it: new study discovers a 460-km river under the Antarctica ice sheet
A river runs beneath it: new study discovers a 460-km river under the Antarctica ice sheet
The discovery of a 460 km river under the Antarctica ice sheet could be the missing link to climate models. A team of researchers led by Dr. Christine Dow, a professor in the department of Geography and Environmental Management and cross-appointed to the Department of Applied Mathematics, discovered the river from a series of airborne radar surveys and modelling.

Health - Environment - 08.11.2022
Low levels of air pollution deadlier than previously thought
Low levels of air pollution deadlier than previously thought
The World Health Organization's most recent estimates (2016) are that over 4.2 million people die prematurely each year due to long-term exposure to fine particulate outdoor air pollution (often referred to as PM 2. A recent study involving McGill researchers now suggests that the annual global death toll from outdoor PM 2.5 may be significantly higher than previously thought.

Environment - Health - 27.10.2022
Traffic-related air pollution linked to increased risk of dementia
Traffic-related air pollution linked to increased risk of dementia
Higher exposure to a certain type of traffic-related air pollution called particulate matter may be linked to an increased risk of dementia, according to a meta-analysis by Western researchers published this week in Neurology , the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. While at Western, graduate student Dr. Ehasan Abolhasani specifically looked at fine particulate matter which consists of pollutant particles of less than 2.5 microns in diameter suspended in air.

Environment - Chemistry - 21.10.2022
Seawater: memory keeper, energy source, and pollution tracking
Sampling seawater just below the surface of a seagrass bed in Quatsino Sound, British Columbia. Credit: Mike McDermid What can a bottle of seawater tell you about the fish living below? Seawater holds -memories- in the form of DNA from fish and invertebrates that have recently passed by. This information, called environmental DNA or eDNA, can be used by scientists to track species across space.

Environment - 17.10.2022
Climate change: trees expected to migrate at slow speed in the boreal forest
Climate change: trees expected to migrate at slow speed in the boreal forest
If the past is any indication, the face of the boreal forest will not change dramatically in the coming decades Boreal forest trees are sensitive to climate change, but their migration in response to temperature fluctuations is not at a gallop. That's according to a study published today in the journal PNAS (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States), where a research team calculated how fast jack pine and black spruce moved north after the last ice age.

Life Sciences - Environment - 12.10.2022
Atlantic salmon: catch and release may affect reproductive success
Atlantic salmon: catch and release may affect reproductive success
Under certain conditions, salmon caught and released have proportionally fewer offspring than salmon that were not caught by anglers Under certain conditions, catching and releasing a salmon would result in a decrease in the number of offspring it produces. This is what researchers from Laval University and their collaborators have shown in a study published in the journal Fisheries Management and Ecology .

Environment - Life Sciences - 11.10.2022
Climate change and deforestation may drive tree-dwelling primates to the ground
Climate change and deforestation may drive tree-dwelling primates to the ground
A large-scale study of 47 species of monkeys and lemurs has found that climate change and deforestation are driving these tree-dwelling animals to the ground, where they are at higher risk due to lack of preferred food and shelter and may experience more negative interaction with humans and domestic animals.

Environment - Chemistry - 06.10.2022
On-site reactors could affordably turn CO2 into valuable chemicals
New technology makes the process of turning CO2 into valuable chemicals economically viable for industrialization New technology developed at the University of Waterloo could make a significant difference in the fight against climate change by affordably converting harmful carbon dioxide (CO2) into fuels and other valuable chemicals on an industrial scale.

Environment - 05.10.2022
Logging down the value chain raises future forest sustainability concerns
Over a 50-year period, logging on B.C.-s Central Coast preferentially targeted the highest value locations on the landscape, according to new research from Simon Fraser University. The systematic depletion of high-value components of the environment raises concerns about future sustainability and intergenerational access to natural resources.

Health - Environment - 03.10.2022
Ambient noise associated with increased risk of stroke
A study supervised by Audrey Smargiassi of UdeM has found that environmental noise is associated with increased risk of stroke among people aged 45 and over in the Montreal area. Every 10-decibel (dBA) increase in outdoor noise raises the risk of stroke by 6% for people aged 45 and over living in the Montreal area.

Environment - 28.09.2022
Researchers identify mechanism responsible for temperature and salinity ’staircases’ in Arctic Ocean
Researchers at the University of Toronto have identified the mechanism responsible for the formation of temperature and salinity "staircases" in the Arctic Ocean, resolving a mystery that has confounded oceanographers and climatologists alike for more than half a century. Understanding how these vertical structures work promises to shed more light on the causes and consequences of rapid Arctic sea ice loss amid climate change.

Environment - Innovation - 28.09.2022
A new window into plants of the past
A new window into plants of the past
Researchers from Université de Montréal and the University of Minnesota have developed a fast, nondestructive way of estimating how millions of dried plant specimens interacted with their environment. CONTENU - Within the cabinets and drawers of the world's herbaria are nearly 400 million dried plant specimens.

Chemistry - Environment - 08.09.2022
Research team investigating 'forever chemicals' in water systems
Research team investigating ’forever chemicals’ in water systems
Researchers at Western's Institute for Chemicals and Fuels from Alternative Resources (ICFAR) a nd collaborators from academia, government and industry are identifying and treating 'forever chemicals' in water systems, an ever-increasing environmental concern which affects more than 2.5 million Canadians.

Environment - 08.09.2022
A sniffer bird
A sniffer bird
The great tit uses its sense of smell to find its way home We agree that the great tit will never be called upon to sniff out suspicious luggage at airports, but this species has more flair than we thought. In fact, a study published in Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution by a team of researchers including Linda Nowack, a doctoral student in the Department of Biology and the Centre d'études nordiques at Université Laval, shows that this bird uses olfactory signals to guide its movements.

Environment - 01.09.2022
Global fish stocks can't rebuild if nothing done to halt climate change and overfishing
Global fish stocks can’t rebuild if nothing done to halt climate change and overfishing
Science, Health & Technology Alex Walls Global fish stocks will not be able to recover to sustainable levels without strong actions to mitigate climate change, a new study has projected. Researchers at UBC, the Stanford Center for Ocean Solutions and University of Bern projected the impact that different global temperature increases and ranges of fishing activity would have on biomass, or the amount of fish by weight in a given area, from 1950 to 2100.

Computer Science - Environment - 31.08.2022
What deep learning algorithms can teach us about snow
What deep learning algorithms can teach us about snow
Canadians think they know a lot about snow. It is practically a national pastime to discuss winter weather. But a PhD candidate in the Department of Geography and Environmental Management at the University of Waterloo is taking the Canadian obsession with weather to a whole new level. Fraser King is studying the ways machine learning can be applied to predicting patterns of precipitation, and especially annual snowfall and snowmelt in the context of climate change.

Environment - 29.08.2022
New research pavilion will advance understanding of extreme weather events and ecosystem effects
New research pavilion will advance understanding of extreme weather events and ecosystem effects
Inauguration of a research facility at Gault Nature Reserve will help connect seven research stations throughout the Saint Lawrence River Valley to study the earth system The new Adaptable Earth Observation System (AEOS) research facility at the Gault Nature Reserve in Mont-Saint-Hilaire is open for business for those conducting cutting-edge research on extreme weather conditions.
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