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Life Sciences - 03.02.2023
A new understanding of reptile colouration
A new understanding of reptile colouration
Snakes and mice don't look alike. But much of what we know about skin colouration and patterning in vertebrates generally, including in snakes, is based on lab mice. However, there are limits to what mice can tell us about other vertebrates because they don't share all of the same types of colour-producing cells, known as chromatophores.

Life Sciences - Health - 02.02.2023
Researchers explore gene therapy model using zinc finger proteins
Researchers explore gene therapy model using zinc finger proteins
Researchers at the University of Toronto and New York University have developed a novel technology that can engineer proteins to target any stretch of DNA in the human genome, opening a door to gene therapies for a broader range of health conditions.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.02.2023
New EEG procedure accurately measures distress caused by tinnitus
New EEG procedure accurately measures distress caused by tinnitus
Researchers discover new way to understand and diagnose patients experiencing ringing in the ears. While it's especially common in older adults, tinnitus - a potentially devastating ringing in the ears - can affect people of all ages. Most often described as consistent buzzing, hissing or humming, tinnitus is usually caused by an underlying condition, like age-related hearing loss, an ear injury or heart disease and affects approximately one in five people in North America.

Health - Life Sciences - 31.01.2023
Colorectal cancer surgery: gut microbiota helps healing
In a promising study, Canadian researchers have shown for the first time in mice that modifying intestinal flora before surgery could reduce postoperative complications in colorectal cancer patients. CONTENU - Published in the journal Gut, the study by scientists at the CHUM Research Centre (CRCHUM) in Montreal identified two bacterial strains that directly affect whether or not anastomotic leakage, more commonly known as intestinal leakage, occurs.

Health - Life Sciences - 31.01.2023
Obesity-related neurodegeneration mimics Alzheimer's disease
Obesity-related neurodegeneration mimics Alzheimer’s disease
Thinning in the right temporo-parietal cortex and left prefrontal cortex were similar in both groups A new study led by scientists at The Neuro (Montreal Neurological Institute-Hospital) of McGill University finds a correlation between neurodegeneration in obese people and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients.

Life Sciences - 27.01.2023
Moths are the new tool to protect Canada’s wetlands
Waterloo biologists are leading the North American pilot program examining insect-based biocontrol of Phragmites. By Katharine Tuerke Faculty of Science University of Waterloo biologists, in partnership with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and the University of Toronto, are leading a North American pilot program that uses moths as a management tool to control an invasive plant threatening Canadian wetlands.

Life Sciences - Environment - 25.01.2023
What crocodile DNA reveals about the Ice Age
What crocodile DNA reveals about the Ice Age
Environmental drivers such as sea level affect genetic evolution and point to where conservation efforts may be focused What drives crocodile evolution? Is climate a major factor or changes in sea levels? Determined to find answers to these questions, researchers from McGill University discovered that while changing temperatures and rainfall had little impact on the crocodiles- gene flow over the past three million years, changes to sea levels during the Ice Age had a different effect.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.01.2023
Better understanding cancer and heart disease
A Canadian-led team of researchers finally identifies the molecular mechanism by which a key protein regulates LDL cholesterol. CONTENU Nabil G. Seidah Credit: IRCM In a crucial step towards understanding the mechanisms involved in cardiovascular disease and certain cancers, a Canadian led research team has succeeded in a world first: they've found the molecular mechanism by which the protein PCSK9 degrades the receptor of low density lipoproteins, the richest cholesterol particles in the bloodstream.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.01.2023
Scientists developing early Alzheimer’s disease detection sensor
By Melissa Shaw Researchers with the SFU Nanodevice Fabrication Group are developing a new biosensor that can be used to screen for Alzheimer's disease and other diseases. An overview of their work has been recently published in the journal Nature Communications. Their sensor works by detecting a particular type of small protein, in this case a cytokine known as Tumour Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF alpha), which is involved with inflammation in the body.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.01.2023
Technologically assisted communication may impair brain development
Technologically assisted communication may impair brain development
According to an international study, the use of videoconferencing platforms such as Zoom and FaceTime has a negative effect on social cognition and its development. Videoconferencing services are proliferating-there's Zoom, Teams, Messenger, FaceTime, Skype, WhatsApp-and since the COVID-19 pandemic they have been seeing heavier use than ever before.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.01.2023
Researchers uncover molecular vulnerability in childhood brain cancer, identify treatment
Researchers uncover molecular vulnerability in childhood brain cancer, identify treatment
A team of researchers from the University of Toronto's Donnelly Centre for Cellular & Biomolecular Research and McMaster University have made a potential breakthrough in medulloblastoma, a form of brain cancer that predominantly affects children and infants - a finding that could lead to new, targeted treatments that are less harmful to developing brains.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.01.2023
Western research leads to new understanding of how HIV hides itself in the body 
Western research leads to new understanding of how HIV hides itself in the body 
When the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infects a person's body, it permanently inserts its genetic material into the genome where it often remains dormant and barely detectable for years. A major obstacle in finding a cure for HIV has been solving the mystery of how this dormant pool of HIV-infected cells, also called HIV latency, is established.

Life Sciences - 05.01.2023
A new understanding of brain functionality may help treat those with memory impairment
A new understanding of brain functionality may help treat those with memory impairment
New research from the University of Toronto is providing valuable insight into how the brain works to retain memory - and it could help treat patients with memory impairment. Alexander Barnett , an assistant professor in the department of psychology in the Faculty of Arts & Science, and a team of researchers have found that a vital part of the brain that helps retain memory - the hippocampus - may have more dynamic interactions with the rest of the brain than previously thought.

Environment - Life Sciences - 02.01.2023
Most species evolve by adapting to similar, large-scale environmental pressures
Most species evolve by adapting to similar, large-scale environmental pressures
Since the days of Charles Darwin, evolutionary biologists have widely believed that most new species form because they've adapted to different environments - but a new University of Toronto study suggests otherwise. The study, published in the journal  Science ,  sheds light on what researchers have dubbed a "blind spot" in our understanding of why new species form.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.12.2022
Cannabis use in adolescents linked with anxiety, memory loss 
Cannabis use in adolescents linked with anxiety, memory loss 
Research finds chronic adolescent cannabis exposure may harm emotional and cognitive brain development through impact on separate brain regions   Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry researchers have shown that chronic exposure during adolescence to tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive component of cannabis, may induce long-lasting memory impairments and increased anxiety levels.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.12.2022
Found: a protective probiotic for ALS
Scientists at the CRCHUM find that a bacterium called Lacticaseibacillus rhamnosus HA-114 prevents neurodegeneration in the C. elegans worm used to study amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. CONTENU - A probiotic bacterium called Lacticaseibacillus rhamnosus HA-114 prevents neurodegeneration in the C. elegans worm , an animal model used to study amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

Health - Life Sciences - 16.12.2022
A ’muscular’ response to regeneration
Therapies to target neuromuscular disorders affecting million of people worldwide are on the horizon thanks to research at the Montreal Clinical Research Institute of Montreal. CONTENU - Neuromuscular disorders affect millions of people worldwide. Now a discovery made at the Montreal Clinical Research Institute of Montreal (IRCM) opens the door to the development of targeted therapies.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.12.2022
Frequent genetic cause of late-onset ataxia uncovered by a Quebec-led international collaboration
Discovery will improve diagnosis and open treatment possibilities for thousands of people with this debilitating neurodegenerative condition worldwide New England Journal of Medicine reports the identification of a previously unknown genetic cause of a late-onset cerebellar ataxia, a discovery that will improve diagnosis and open new treatment avenues for this progressive condition.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.12.2022
From COVID-19 to the common cold: UBC scientists identify broadly effective, infection-halting compound
From COVID-19 to the common cold: UBC scientists identify broadly effective, infection-halting compound
Science, Health & Technology Brett Goldhawk Researchers at UBC's Life Sciences Institute have identified a compound that shows early promise at halting infections from a range of coronaviruses, including all variants of SARS-CoV-2 and the common cold. The findings, published this week in Molecular Biomedicine , reveal a potential path toward antiviral treatments that could be used against many different pathogens.

Life Sciences - 14.12.2022
Brain stimulation improves reading ability in macular degeneration patients
A new study is the first to show brain stimulation improves reading in patients with macular degeneration. Drug treatments only slow down the progression of the disease, but Waterloo scientists discovered they could train the brain to use the information it receives more efficiently. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive, painless brain stimulation treatment that uses direct electrical currents to stimulate specific parts of the brain.
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