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Career - 15.08.2022
Cash may not be the most effective way to motivate employees
Cash may not be the most effective way to motivate employees
Employees are motivated by rewards that are perceived as distinct from salary Tangible rewards motivate employees when they're easy to use, pleasurable, unexpected, and distinct from salary, a new study found. A recent survey of firms in the United States revealed that 84 per cent spent more than $90 billion annually on tangible employee rewards, such as gift cards, recreation trips and merchandise in hopes of increasing productivity.

Health - Social Sciences - 15.08.2022
Early sexual experiences could lead to healthier sex later in life: University of Toronto study
In her research,  Diana Peragine  encountered study after study that suggested an early sexual debut poses a risk to sexual health and sets the stage for a long list of negative outcomes, from unplanned pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections to sexual exploitation and abuse.

Health - 15.08.2022
Measuring the social impact of disruptive weather, plus other stories
New research stories from McGill University. Using artificial intelligence to study the social impact of disruptive weather events Does a -disruptive weather event- imply extreme weather? Not necessarily, say two McGill researchers. Instead of focusing on social impacts, weather research tends to focus on meteorology.

Health - 12.08.2022
Using sound and bubbles to make bandages stickier and longer lasting
Using sound and bubbles to make bandages stickier and longer lasting
Researchers have discovered that they can control the stickiness of adhesive bandages using ultrasound waves and bubbles. This breakthrough could lead to new advances in medical adhesives, especially in cases where adhesives are difficult to apply such as on wet skin. -Bandages, glues, and stickers are common bioadhesives that are used at home or in clinics.

Environment - 11.08.2022
Stormwater management ponds may not hold the solution for depleting wetlands
Researchers recommend that protections be strengthened for wetlands of all sizes Relying on stormwater management (SWM) ponds to restore the depleting wetlands is not sustainable and lacks the critical ecosystem services vital for biodiversity, a new study found. With the continued losses of wetlands projected in the near future and emphasis on the underestimation of provincial wetland loss, the study captures the contributions of SWM ponds in a changing network of water bodies and the effects of land use and land cover in this change.

Environment - Campus - 10.08.2022
Opportunity for inclusivity in recreation planning for Protected Areas
Many socio-demographic groups are underrepresented among visitors to Protected Areas Many socio-demographic groups, such as those with disabilities and minority ethnic communities, are underrepresented among visitors to Protected Areas due to institutional barriers, a new study found. Protected Areas (PA) provide many benefits to visitors, including mental and physical health and environmental knowledge.

Health - Chemistry - 10.08.2022
University of Toronto chemist aims to improve diagnosis of disease one protein molecule at a time
University of Toronto chemist aims to improve diagnosis of disease one protein molecule at a time
Scientists understand that proteins cause various diseases, from Alzheimer's to cystic fibrosis to Parkinson's to cataracts. But detecting them before they trigger illness is still a work in progress. For University of Toronto analytical chemist  Alana Ogata , the answer is to find better ways to identify single protein molecules in our bodily fluids, such as blood, urine, saliva and sweat.

Agronomy / Food Science - 09.08.2022
How artificial intelligence can make our food safer
How artificial intelligence can make our food safer
Food recalls could be a thing of the past if artificial intelligence (AI) is utilized in food production, according to a recent study from UBC and the University of Guelph. The average cost of a food recall due to bacterial or microbial contamination, like E. coli , is US$10 million according to study co-author Dr. Rickey Yada (he/him) , a professor and the dean of the UBC faculty of land and food systems.

Environment - 09.08.2022
Building resilience for a future of climate change
Political scientist Daniel Henstra speaks to AMO on how Ontario municipalities can prepare for climate impacts By Jon Parsons University Relations Climate change is such a huge issue that it can be difficult to even know where to start. It involves sophisticated science and mountains of data, as well as social, political and economic implications that intersect with various academic disciplines.

Transport - Health - 09.08.2022
Study challenges attitudes about young people and pandemic preventative measures, plus other stories
Top marks: Quebec university students score high with COVID-19 compliance A new study led by McGill researchers found that compliance with public health measures was high among university level students in Quebec during a critical period of the pandemic in 2021. They found 78% per cent of students observed in the study followed the proper mask-wearing and two-metre physical distancing rules, close to the 80 per cent threshold suggested as necessary to reduce the spread of COVID-19.

Life Sciences - Mechanical Engineering - 08.08.2022
Tip for riders of hoverboards
Tip for riders of hoverboards
Engineering researchers have some simple advice for people learning to ride hoverboards: it's all in the ankles. An experiment using sophisticated cameras and sensors attached to first-time riders revealed that ankle movements, not knee or hip movements, are the key to catching on to the increasingly popular devices.

Health - 04.08.2022
Passive exercise offers same brain health benefits as active movements: study 
Passive exercise offers same brain health benefits as active movements: study 
A new study by kinesiology graduate students from Western has found passive exercise leads to increased cerebral blood flow and improved executive function, providing the same cognitive benefits as active exercise. Published in Psychophysiology , the study is the first to look at whether there would be benefits to brain health during passive exercise where a person's limbs are moved via an external force - in this case, cycle pedals pushed by a mechanically driven flywheel.

Politics - 04.08.2022
Critical thinking protecting Ukrainians against Russia's disinformation campaign
Critical thinking protecting Ukrainians against Russia’s disinformation campaign
In disinformation campaigns, like the long-standing pro-Kremlin campaign targeted at Ukraine by the Russian government, who is most at risk of believing false information? A study led by McGill University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) found that Ukrainians who engaged in more analytic thinking were less likely to believe the pro-Kremlin disinformation, even if they were generally pro-Russia.

Physics - 04.08.2022
Up a creek without a paddle? Researchers suggest 'gunwale bobbing'
Up a creek without a paddle? Researchers suggest ’gunwale bobbing’
Stand up in a canoe and you'll probably find yourself in the water before too long. Jump up and down on the upper edges of the sides of the canoe, and you'll likely end up in the drink as well. But get the balance right and you'll be able to move yourself along by as much as one metre per second, according to  a study published in  Physical Review Fluids  examining gunwale bobbing.

Social Sciences - 03.08.2022
Bioarchaeologists confirm museum shrunken head as human remains
Bioarchaeologists confirm museum shrunken head as human remains
Researchers from Western University have verified the authenticity of a South American tsantsa (shrunken head) as human remains, an important step in the global effort toward decolonization and preserving and understanding Indigenous history. The findings were published today in the high impact journal PLOS One .

Sport - 03.08.2022
Northern Hail Project recovers record-breaking hailstone
Northern Hail Project recovers record-breaking hailstone
A Canadian record-breaking hailstone was recovered by Western University's Northern Hail Project (NHP) field team, following a storm earlier this week near Markerville, Alta. The record-breaker weighs 292.71 grams, eclipsing the previous title holder - a hailstone weighing 290 grams, collected nearly 50 years ago in Cedoux, Sask.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.08.2022
Travel restrictions significantly reduced COVID-19 cases entering Canada - but insufficient to prevent new outbreaks
Travel restrictions significantly reduced COVID-19 cases entering Canada - but insufficient to prevent new outbreaks
Science, Health & Technology Brett Goldhawk Canada's restrictions on international travel drastically reduced the number of COVID-19 cases entering the country during the first waves of the pandemic but were insufficient to prevent new outbreaks, according to a new study led by University of British Columbia researchers.

Health - Computer Science - 02.08.2022
New diabetes monitor can detect glucose levels using breath
A next-generation diabetes monitor that analyses breath might soon mean no more needle pricks to check blood sugar levels. The device uses gas sensors to measure breath instantly, then links via Bluetooth with a program on a mobile device to give a readout. Distinct biomarkers in exhaled breath carry a subtle signature that the device picks up before the app uses a deep learning algorithm to produce rapid individual results.

Life Sciences - 02.08.2022
Researchers crack 30-year-old mystery of odour switching in worms
Researchers crack 30-year-old mystery of odour switching in worms
Soil-dwelling nematodes depend on their sophisticated sense of smell for survival, able to distinguish between more than a thousand different scents - but the molecular mechanism behind their olfaction has baffled scientists for decades. Now, researchers at the University of Toronto's Terrence Donnelly Centre for Cellular & Biomolecular Research appear to have solved the long-standing mystery - and the implications of their findings stretch beyond nematode olfaction, perhaps offering insights into how the human brain functions.

Health - Psychology - 01.08.2022
COVID-19 can be less stressful for the LGBTQ+
Researchers at Université de Montréal find that social support among LGBTQ+ community members - sometimes called "chosen families" - can help them better cope psychologically with the pandemic. For lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ+) people, the COVID-19 pandemic has brought a lot of inequities faced by their community to the fore, including the precarious state of their mental health.
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